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Will My Teeth Stay Where My Orthodontist Moved Them?

October 17th, 2018

Change is a natural part of life. Just as our bodies change throughout our whole life, our teeth change too. We start out with no teeth, then get baby teeth, and shed those in favor of permanent teeth. Sometimes there are problems with tooth placement and jaw positions. That’s where the orthodontist is called in to bring about a change for the better, and transform misaligned teeth and jaws into a healthy and beautiful smile.

After orthodontic treatment is complete the most reliable way to keep your teeth where you and your orthodontist moved them is by wearing your retainers as prescribed. Your teeth will not stay where your orthodontist moved them unless you do. Changes in tooth position are a lifelong and naturally occurring phenomenon, and to maintain the result created by your orthodontic treatment, retainers must be worn. While small changes after treatment concludes are normal, retainers prevent teeth from going back to their original positions.

When treatment is complete, there is a “settling in” period; teeth adjust as you bite, chew, swallow and speak – actions that all place forces on your teeth. These small changes in tooth position are not a failure of orthodontic treatment, but are a natural process. If your retainer is not worn as prescribed, however, large changes occur instead. Large changes are disappointing to the patient, and to the orthodontist. If you are in retainers, and should you notice an unwanted change in your bite or your smile, or if you should lose a removable retainer or damage a fixed retainer (bonded in behind teeth), contact your orthodontist right away. Don’t give teeth an opportunity to shift. Commit to wearing retainers as prescribed by your orthodontist and limit undesirable changes!

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) is open exclusively to orthodontists – only orthodontists are admitted for membership. The only doctors who can call themselves “orthodontists” have graduated from dental school and then successfully completed the additional two-to-three years of education in an accredited orthodontic residency program.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a specialist orthodontist, an expert in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics who possesses the skills and experience to give you your best smile.

 

Source: www.aaoinfo.org

Why should I take my child back to the orthodontist for observational visits?

October 8th, 2018

Congratulations on taking your child to see an American Association of Orthodontist (AAO) orthodontist! If an area of concern was noted, the orthodontist may have suggested periodic observational visits, which may include x-rays and photos. Their purpose is to keep an eye on how your child’s teeth, face and jaws are developing. Visits may be scheduled once or twice a year.

Are these visits are really necessary? Yes they are! These visits allow your orthodontist to monitor changes as your child grows.

The kinds of things your orthodontist will be watching include whether:

  • Baby teeth are being lost schedule
  • Permanent teeth are coming in symmetrically, in the correct sequence at the correct time
  • Upper and lower jaws are developing properly
  • Permanent teeth have enough room to come in
    permanent teeth coming in

If treatment is necessary to intercept a developing or existing problem, there is often an ideal time for treatment to begin. These return visits help determine the best time to in start treatment.

Treatment doesn’t always mean a child gets braces. Treatment could consist of pulling a stubborn baby tooth at the right time, or intervention help to stop sucking habit. AAO orthodontists are experts in knowing what type of treatment is needed, and when it will be most beneficial.

Do continue to have your child seen periodically by your orthodontist if it has been recommended. You will be giving your child the opportunity to get the best results from their orthodontic treatment and the precious gift of a healthy, beautiful smile.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) is open exclusively to orthodontists – only orthodontists are admitted for membership. The only doctors who can call themselves “orthodontists” have graduated from dental school and then successfully completed the additional two-to-three years of education in an accredited orthodontic residency program.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a specialist orthodontist, an expert in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics who possesses the skills and experience to give you your best smile.

 

Source: www.aaoinfo.org

If my front teeth are straight, why should I be concerned about how my teeth fit together?

October 3rd, 2018

Looks Can Be Deceiving

Things are not always as they appear. We all know people who from the outside look healthy, but who internally are battling a chronic illness. Likewise, you may be interested to learn that even if your front teeth are straight, there can be a problem with how all your teeth fit together – a problem that can be bad for your overall oral health.

When the Bite’s Not Right

Think about gears. Their “teeth” are engineered to fit together in a specific way to perform a specific task. If they don’t fit together in the right way, the gears can’t do their jobs. It’s the same with your teeth. Upper and lower teeth are meant to fit in a certain way with their counterparts in the opposite jaw. If the fit is off, the bite is not right – even if the front teeth look straight. If the bad bite is not corrected, the stage is being set for potential problems.

The Goal of Orthodontic Treatment

The true goal of orthodontic treatment is to create a healthy bite so you can bite and chew food efficiently and comfortably. Teeth that work better tend to look better too. The beautiful smile is a pleasant side effect of treatment.

A healthy bite is achieved by repositioning teeth within the jaw bones, and ensuring they meet as intended to allow for biting and chewing.

The following bite problems can be difficult to see because often times the front teeth are straight:

  • An underbite (or anterior crossbite) – when the top teeth are positioned behind the bottom teeth
  • An open bite – when the back teeth are closed, but the front teeth don’t meet, or when the front teeth meet, but the back teeth don’t touch
  • A deep bite – when top teeth completely cover the bottom teeth
  • A crossbite – when the bottom teeth are outside of the top teeth

If an improper bite is not treated, problems develop. Premature wear of teeth and chipping of teeth is a very common problem. Jaw joint problems can develop. There is a higher risk of cavities. All of this can make it difficult to eat and talk.

The good news is there is a way to check your bite and ensure none of this happens to you. Having a healthy bite applies to all of your teeth, not just the few front teeth people see when you smile. Check your bite, or your child’s, by consulting an American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) orthodontist. More good news – many AAO orthodontists offer free or low-cost initial consultations.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) is open exclusively to orthodontists – only orthodontists are admitted for membership. The only doctors who can call themselves “orthodontists” have graduated from dental school and then successfully completed the additional two-to-three years of education in an accredited orthodontic residency program.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a specialist orthodontist, an expert in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics who possesses the skills and experience to give you your best smile.

Source: www.aaoinfo.org

What Is An Impacted Tooth?

September 25th, 2018

You may have heard the term “impacted” used to describe a tooth and wonder what it means.

In orthodontic or dental terms, “impacted” means that a tooth either has not come in (“erupted”) when expected or a tooth that cannot erupt because it does not have room or may be coming in the wrong direction or position. What causes an impacted tooth may not be known – for some people, it just happens. Genetics can play a role, so if a parent had an impacted tooth, their child may experience the same problem.

We often hear about older teenagers or adults having impacted wisdom teeth. But other teeth can be impacted, too.

Fixing impacted teeth

In the X-ray above, the permanent canine is coming in sideways, colliding with the root of another tooth.

Children who are getting their permanent teeth can have impacted teeth. A permanent tooth can be trapped in the gums if a baby tooth does not fall out on time or if something blocks the permanent tooth’s path, such as a cyst. A permanent tooth may not erupt at all, or if it does, the tooth may appear in the wrong place. Sometimes, an impacted tooth can harm the roots of neighboring teeth. Impacted teeth can also cause crowding, and may cause already erupted teeth to move into unhealthy positions. Children may find it difficult to bite or chew, and there can be tenderness or pain. As the teeth become crowded, appearance is affected, and self-esteem can decline.

The permanent first molar is stuck or “impacted”, the baby tooth will not allow the molar to erupt.

Fixing an impacted tooth can range from relatively simple to complicated. It all depends on the extent of the problem. Extracting a baby tooth may be all that is needed to make room for the permanent tooth to erupt into the proper position. But if an upper jaw is too narrow, it may be necessary to expand the jaw, which creates more room for permanent teeth to come in. Other problems might require a combination of oral surgery and orthodontic treatment to place an attachment on the impacted tooth and the orthodontist then guides the tooth into the proper position.

Fixing impacted teeth

Timely treatment by an AAO orthodontic specialist ensures teeth come in properly, reducing the damage done to other teeth.

The old adage “a stitch in time saves nine” applies here. It may be easier for an orthodontist to identify and correct a patient’s problem when it is forming rather than waiting for it to fully develop. To this end, the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that children get a check-up with an AAO orthodontist no later than age 7. Orthodontists’ specialized education enables them to diagnose even subtle problems while some baby teeth are still present. If a problem is in the making, an early check-up and x-ray will let the orthodontist recommend intervention when it’s best for the patient.

Many AAO orthodontists offer initial consultations at no cost and with no obligation. No referral is needed from the dentist, but dental check-ups are necessary during any orthodontic treatment. A check-up with an orthodontist gives your child the best opportunity to enjoy a healthy, beautiful smile.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) is open exclusively to orthodontists – only orthodontists are admitted for membership. The only doctors who can call themselves “orthodontists” have graduated from dental school and then successfully completed the additional two-to-three years of education in an accredited orthodontic residency program.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a specialist orthodontist, an expert in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics who possesses the skills and experience to give you your best smile.

 

Source: www.aaoinfo.org

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