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Why Filing Teeth Yourself Is Not A Good Idea

June 29th, 2022

vDentists warn against TikTok trend where people 'straighten' their teeth  with nail files - Mirror Online

You’ve seen the TikTok trend of people using a nail file to grind their teeth down for a more even appearance, and thought, “Seems harmless, right?”

WRONG!

Unlike fingernails, teeth are permanent. What you remove won’t grow back.

The protective layer of enamel you’re chipping away at is limited. Once you break through it, the damage is done. It’s such an important part of your tooth’s health, and without it, you’re basically just shortening the lifespan of your teeth. Soon, you could experience tooth sensitivity and even loss.

So what should you do about your uneven teeth?

Work with an AAO orthodontic professional. Dr. Pamela Johnson an Orthodontist located in Willowbrook, IL is trained in understanding the structure of your teeth. As an expert, she can determine why your teeth are uneven in the first place. she will work with you to decide if you’re a good candidate for professional filing, called enameloplasty, or if another type of orthodontic treatment would be more beneficial.

Remember, teeth shift throughout your lifetime. In a few years, your teeth may shift again and now you’d just be working with shorter teeth. Not a good place to be.

Trust an AAO Orthodontist

You can work with Dr. Pamela Johnson, an American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) Orthodontist to achieve a healthy, beautiful smile at any age. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligned teeth and jaws – and possess the skills and experience to give you your best smile.  - source/aaoinfo.org

You Dont Have To Wait For Your Dentist To Refer Your Child To An Orthodontist

June 14th, 2022

 Young girl in grass smiling Reno, Nevada, USA kids braces stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

You don’t have to wait for your dentist to refer your child to an orthodontist.

Parents are often the first to recognize that something is not quite right about their child’s teeth or their jaws. A parent may notice that the front teeth don’t come together when the back teeth are closed, or that the upper teeth are sitting inside of the lower teeth. They may assume that their dentist is aware of the anomaly, and that the dentist will make a referral to an orthodontist when the time is right. A referral might not happen if the dentist isn’t evaluating the bite.

AAO orthodontists don’t require a referral from a dentist to make an appointment with them.

What parents should look for:

Signs that the bite’s not right:

  • Early or late loss of baby teeth
  • Difficulty in chewing or biting
  • Mouth breathing
  • Jaws that shift or make sounds
  • Speech difficulties
  • Biting the cheek or the roof of the mouth
  • Facial imbalance
  • Grinding or clenching of teeth

Dentists and orthodontists may have different perspectives.

Dentists are looking at the overall health of the teeth and mouth. He/she could be looking at how well the patient brushes and flosses, or if there are cavities. While dentists look at the upper and lower teeth, they may not study how the upper and lower teeth make contact.

Orthodontists are looking at the bite, meaning the way teeth come together. This is orthodontists’ specialty. Orthodontists take the upper and lower jaws into account. Even if teeth appear to be straight, mismatched jaws can be part of a bad bite.

 

A healthy bite is the goal of orthodontic treatment.

A healthy bite denotes good function – biting, chewing and speaking. It also means teeth and jaws are in proportion to the rest of the face.

 

The AAO recommends children get their first check-up with an AAO orthodontist no later than age 7.

Kids have a mix of baby and permanent teeth around age 7. Dr. Pamela Johnson who is a member of the AAO, is an orthodontist that is uniquely trained to evaluate children’s growth as well as the exchange of baby teeth for permanent teeth. Orthodontists are expertly qualified to determine whether a problem exists, or if one is developing.

 

AAO orthodontists often offer initial exams at no (or low) cost, and at no obligation.

Visit Dr. Pamela Johnson Willowbrook, IL  for your in depth consultation.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a highly skilled specialist. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligned teeth and jaws – and possesses the skills and experience to give you your best smile.   source/aaoinfo.org

Are Tongue Scrapers And Cleaners Effective?

June 2nd, 2022

Tongue scraper Stock Photos, Royalty Free Tongue scraper Images | Depositphotos

A tongue scraper is a tool used to help clean your tongue. Tongue scrapers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and work by starting at the back of the tongue and pulling the scraper forward. Some people choose to clean their tongue by using their toothbrush as well.

Some say that cleaning your tongue helps keep your breath fresh, but there is no evidence that brushing or scraping your tongue will prevent bad breath or improve halitosis (chronic bad breath). In fact, bad breath bacteria can grow back just as fast as you remove it.

If you like the way your mouth feels after you clean your tongue, keep it up as part of your daily dental routine. It can be a great way to go the extra mile for your mouth, but comes down to personal preference and is not a necessary step. However, there are four things you can do to make sure your mouth is healthy:

1. Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.

2. Clean between your teeth daily.

3. Eat a healthy diet that limits sugary beverages and snacks.

4. See your dentist regularly for prevention and treatment of dental disease.

source/mouthhealthy.org

Should My Child Wait Until They Have All Of Their Permanent Teeth To See An Orthodontist?

June 2nd, 2022

 When Do Kids Get Their Permanent Teeth? | Learn More
   If someone tells you that your child should have all of his/her permanent teeth before visiting the orthodontist for the first time, that “someone” is incorrect . In fact, putting off a first visit to the orthodontist until all of a child’s permanent teeth are in could do more harm than good. Here’s why:

There’s a lot more going on than meets the eye.

A child’s mouth is a busy place. Think about a 6-year-old. Everything is growing, including the bones in the jaw and face. At around age 6, the first permanent molars appear. An exchange of teeth begins as baby teeth fall out and are replaced by larger-sized permanent teeth. And it all happens in a predictable, particular order. Unless it doesn’t.

The gums hide about two-thirds of each tooth, as well as all the bone that hold teeth in place. The gums can mask conditions that interfere with the emergence of teeth.

Parents can watch for clues. Early or late loss of baby teeth can signal a problem. So can trouble with chewing or biting, speech difficulties and mouth-breathing. If these indicators are not addressed until a child has all of his/her permanent teeth and growth is essentially complete, correcting the problem may be more difficult than it might have been had treatment occurred earlier.

Orthodontic treatment is about creating a healthy bite – the beautiful smile is a bonus.

The goal of orthodontic treatment is to make sure the bite is right – that upper and lower teeth fit together like interlocking gears. The timing of your child’s treatment is critical and is based on his/her individual needs. Dr. Pamela Johnson can help determine if intervention is needed.

Some children can wait until they have all or most of their permanent teeth. Other children’s orthodontic problems may be better treated while some baby teeth are present. These children require growth guidance of bones in the upper and lower jaws, so there’s enough room for permanent teeth. Their treatment can be timed to predictable stages of dental development and physical growth. Once teeth and jaws are in alignment, a beautiful smile is the bonus result of treatment.

Dentists and orthodontists look at the mouth differently.

Both doctors work in the mouth. But perspectives differ based on the care they provide.

Dentists assess and promote overall oral health. They look for cavities and gum disease. They advise patients on diet and home hygiene care. And they monitor patients for diseases that appear in or affect the mouth. Dentists take “bite wing” x-rays to isolate a particular section of teeth as part of their diagnosis and treatment planning process. Orthodontic evaluations may be a lower priority for dentists.

Orthodontists are laser-focused on each patient’s bite. Orthodontists use “panoramic” x-rays to visualize all of the teeth above and below the gums, and the jaws, all at once. The bite is orthodontists’ area of specialization. 

If your dentist has not referred your child to an orthodontist, you need not wait for a referral. Orthodontists do not require a referral for your child to be seen.

Here’s what the experts say: remember age 7.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that children have their first visit with an orthodontist no later than age 7. If a problem is detected and treatment is advised, you are giving the orthodontist the opportunity to provide your child with the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time.

To answer the question that headlines this blog, there’s no need to wait until your child has lost all his/her baby teeth before you consult an orthodontist. It’s fine to talk to an orthodontist as soon as you suspect a problem in your child, even if your child is younger than 7. Many orthodontists offer a free or low-cost initial consultation. And adults – there’s no time like the present to talk to an orthodontist about getting the smile you’ve always wanted. You can visit Dr. Pamela Johnson Willowbrook, IL at Johnson Orthodontics for your childs initial consultation today. source/aaoinfo.org

3 Tips For A Healthy Summer Smile

June 1st, 2022

smiling faces in sand

Summer sun brings summer fun. While warm months are perfect for spending time together, summer vacation can also throw off your usual dental routine. Here are three ways to prevent summertime tooth decay:

Stay on a routine

Whether your kids are staying up to catch fireflies or a fireworks show, resist the temptation to skip brushing before a late bedtime—or let it slide when they sleep in the next morning. Don’t forget about your smile over the summer, It’s important for families to consistently brush and floss, which keeps kids on track for healthy back-to-school dental visits.”

No matter how eventful the upcoming months become, supervise that they are brushing twice a day for 2 minutes with fluoride toothpaste. Simple things like brushing calendars can help everyone stay on track over the summer. Plus, it’s a chance to spend more time together. Brushing alongside your children for 2 minutes, twice a day for the three months of summer gives you 6 extra hours together, so make the most of them!

And don’t forget to clean between those teeth once a day. Your children should be flossing between any two teeth that touch, However many kids don’t have motor skills to floss until they are over 10 years old. If your child needs help, try different types of interdental cleaners or put your hands over theirs to guide them and get the job done at the same time.

Say no to sugary drinks and snacks

As the temperature rises, it’s common for families to sip and snack during sports tournaments, festivals or nearly any community event. Watch your family’s intake of lemonade, juice and soda, Consider sugary drinks treats to enjoy once in a while, and not often. Instead, offer water (even better if it has fluoride) to beat the heat, or milk to drink with meals. And, don’t let summertime grazing damage your child’s smile. Taking a break from snacking is healthy for your teeth, It allows time for saliva to bathe the teeth to wash away leftover food and get stronger.

If you find yourself spending more time at home, snack smarter, and let your children tell you when they’re hungry instead of offering snacks throughout the day.

Make your back-to-school dental visit early

Some schools require back-to-school dental visits for certain grades, and these checkups can be a good way to be sure your child’s teeth stayed healthy. It is a good idea to make your child’s back-to-school appointment early in the summer to avoid the August rush and help insure you get the appointment time that works best for you. Visiting the dentist regularly can help your child’s smile stay healthy all year long.  source/mouthhealthy.org

Why Does A Crossbite Need To Be Fixed?

June 1st, 2022

Crossbite - Vibrant Smiles Mableton GA Dentist Dr Chea Rainford

 

 

 

A crossbite is a type of malocclusion, or a misalignment of teeth, where upper teeth fit inside of lower teeth. This misalignment can affect a single tooth or groups of teeth, involving the front teeth, back teeth, or both:

  1. Posterior crossbite: If the back teeth are affected, upper teeth sit inside of bottom teeth.
  2. Anterior crossbite: If the front teeth are in crossbite, one or more top teeth sit behind the bottom teeth. Not to be confused with an underbite, when all the top teeth, or jaw, are behind the bottom teeth

When teeth are lined up correctly, the upper teeth are naturally wider because they lay on the outside of the bottom teeth.

What causes a crossbite?

A crossbite can occur from genetics, delayed loss of baby teeth or abnormal eruption of permanent teeth, even prolonged actions like thumb sucking or swallowing in an abnormal way can generate damaging pressure. Teeth can be pushed out of place; bone can be distorted.

Why does a crossbite need to be fixed?

A crossbite may reveal an underlying jaw problem that is best addressed at a young age, while the face and jaws are still developing. Possible consequences if not corrected include:

  • the jaw shifting to one side
  • lopsided jaw growth
  • wearing down of outer layer of the tooth called “enamel”

How does an AAO orthodontist correct a crossbite?

Depending on the scope of the crossbite, treatment may involve the use of a palatal expander, a fixed or removable orthodontic appliance used to make the upper jaw wider. This would be used alongside an appliance designed to move the teeth, such as braces or clear aligners.

Dr. Pamela Johnson Willowbrook, IL who is a trained orthodontic specialist knows when each method, or both, and can help you determine which is best for you.

See an AAO orthodontist

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a highly skilled specialist. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligned teeth and jaws – and possess the skills and experience to give you your best smile. aaoinfo.org

Athletes Are More Likely To Have Poor Oral Health

May 31st, 2022

Sport. Young athlete drinking water of bottle after running Sport. Runner. Top view sport drink stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Despite an outward picture of wellness and a healthy oral hygiene routine, athletes still tend to have more teeth-related problems than their peers. A recent study, published in the British Dental Journal, found that despite regular brushing and flossing, untreated tooth decay and gum inflammation was still prevalent among elite athletes.

Why?

Because they often refuel with high-acid drinks, gels and energy bars – all of which can weaken tooth enamel and damage teeth due to high sugar content and acidity.

The study found nearly half (49 percent) of elite endurance athletes had untreated tooth decay, and the majority of them had early signs of gum inflammation.

Even despite these same athletes reporting better dental hygiene than the general population – with 94 percent brushing their teeth at least twice a day, and 44 percent flossing regularly.

Let’s break it down (so your teeth don’t).

The acid in sports drinks and gels dissolves tooth enamel, a process called decalcification, and can lead to cavities. Once enamel dissolves, it does not come back. The loss and decay are permanent.

Add the sugar from sports drinks and gels to the mix, and the risk to tooth enamel doubles.

Plaque uses sugar and starches as food and expels acid as a by-product. If plaque is not removed regularly by brushing and flossing, the build-up can lead to additional decalcification, cavities, gum disease and loss of the bone that holds teeth in place.

What does this mean for orthodontic patients?

Athletes undergoing orthodontic treatment should be on high alert. Sports drinks are even harder on teeth with orthodontic appliances, such as braces or aligners.

For those wearing braces, visible white marks (decalcification) around your brackets can appear within a couple of months if plaque is not removed. For those wearing aligners, the damage may be amplified and occur all over because the acidic liquid seeps into the aligners and sits against teeth. Consult with Dr. Pamela Johnson for recommended beverages when undergoing your orthodontic treatment.

 

Bottom line – skip the sports drinks and gels.

Opt for water or other less-acidic choices. If that’s not an option, consider swishing water after sips, drinking through a straw or brushing and flossing after workouts. A fluoride rinse may also be helpful. See your dentist every six months for a professional cleaning and check-up, or more often if recommended.

Be aware that soda, sweet tea, bubbly flavored water and other carbonated beverages can have the same negative effects and should be avoided as well.

Trust an AAO orthodontist.

You can contact  Dr. Pamela Johnson of Johnson Orthodontics Willowbrook, IL. She is a member of the  American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) and can help you achieve a healthy, beautiful smile at any age. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligned teeth and jaws – and possess the skills and experience to give you your best smile. aaoinfo.org

Internet Trend To Avoid

May 26th, 2022

Can Mewing Reshape Your Face? How to Do It and What the Research Says

 

 

v

 

Despite popular opinion, the internet might not have all the answers…especially when it comes to your facial structure. The online do-it-yourself facial restructuring trend known as mewing (which, by the way, is not a medical term) suggests that tongue placement can define your jawline. While proper tongue alignment could alter your facial structure, there’s more to it.

There’s more to facial restructuring.

It’s a complex process that involves changes in jaw bones, facial bones and soft tissue.

The natural resting position of your tongue is an important clue to what’s going on in your mouth. It could lead to tongue thrusting, or the tongue can even push teeth out of alignment causing bite problems or speech and swallowing problems.

Before considering doing it yourself, individuals should always start by asking themselves if they are comfortable starting treatment without knowing what is happening below the surface. Any unsupervised attempts to move teeth/align jaws is not recommended by the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO).

What should you do if you’re concerned about your tongue’s resting position?

Consult an orthodontist, Dr. Pamela Johnson Willowbrook, IL who is a member of the AAO can evaluate your tongue position. Orthodontists are trained in understanding the structure of your teeth, jaw bones and facial bones. They can also properly evaluate how changing one part of the mouth may impact other parts—for example, how the natural resting position of your tongue may be affecting your speech or causing bite problems.

Before considering a DIY treatment, patients should consider the potential irreversible and expensive damage if not done correctly.

Trust an AAO orthodontist.

Orthodontists are the only dental specialists who have additional education and training focused exclusively on the movement of teeth, jawbones, facial bones, and soft tissue–3,700 hours of specialized training to be exact. They understand growth and development and are also called dentofacial orthopedists.  Find an orthodontist near you at aaoinfo.org/locator.

Happy Memorial Day From All Of Us At Johnson Orthodontics!

May 25th, 2022

Have A Happy And Safe Memorial Day Pictures, Photos, and Images for  Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, and Twitter

Thinking About Teeth Whitening?

May 23rd, 2022

Beautiful smile and white teeth of a young woman. Beautiful smile and white teeth of a young woman. Matching the shades of the implants or the process of teeth whitening. white teeth stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Brushing and flossing are everyday ways to keep your teeth bright, white and healthy. Still, if you might feel like your smile is lacking some sparkle or is more yellow than it used to be, you’re not alone. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve about their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth. The American Association of Orthodontists also found that nearly 90% of patients requested tooth whitening.

Thinking about teeth whitening? Talk to your dentist or your orthodontist,Dr. Pamela Johnson can help. Get the facts first. Here are five of the most commonly asked questions about the process.

Why Did My Teeth Change Color?

Over time, your teeth can go from white to not-so-bright for a number of reasons:

Food and Drink
Coffee, tea and red wine are some major staining culprits. What do they have in common? Intense color pigments called chromogens that attach to the white, outer part of your tooth (enamel).

Tobacco Use
Two chemicals found in tobacco create stubborn stains: Tar and nicotine. Tar is naturally dark. Nicotine is colorless until it’s mixed with oxygen. Then, it turns into a yellowish, surface-staining substance.

Age
Below the hard, white outer shell of your teeth (enamel) is a softer area called dentin. Over time, the outer enamel layer gets thinner with brushing and more of the yellowish dentin shows through.

Trauma
If you’ve been hit in the mouth, your tooth may change color because it reacts to an injury by laying down more dentin, which is a darker layer under the enamel.

Medications
Tooth darkening can be a side effect of certain antihistamines, antipsychotics and high blood pressure medications. Young children who are exposed to antibiotics like tetracycline and doxycycline when their teeth are forming (either in the womb or as a baby) may have discoloration of their adult teeth later in life. Chemotherapy and head and neck radiation can also darken teeth.

How Does Teeth Whitening Work?

Teeth whitening is a simple process. Whitening products contain one of two tooth bleaches (hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide). These bleaches break stains into smaller pieces, which makes the color less concentrated and your teeth brighter.

Does Whitening Work on All Teeth?

No, which is why it’s important to talk to your dentist or orthodontist  before deciding to whiten your teeth, as whiteners may not correct all types of discoloration. For example, yellow teeth will probably bleach well, brown teeth may not respond as well and teeth with gray tones may not bleach at all. Whitening will not work on caps, veneerscrowns or fillings. It also won’t be effective if your tooth discoloration is caused by medications or a tooth injury.

What Are My Whitening Options?

Talk to your dentist or orthodontist before starting. If you are a candidate, there are four ways to put the shine back in your smile:

Stain Removal Toothpastes
All toothpastes help remove surface stain through the action of mild abrasives that scrub the teeth. Look for whitening toothpastes that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance for stain removal (it will tell you on the package). These toothpastes have additional polishing agents that are safe for your teeth and provide stain removal effectiveness. Unlike bleaches, these types of ADA-Accepted products do not change the color of teeth because they can only remove stains on the surface.

In-Office Bleaching
This procedure is called chairside bleaching and usually requires only one office visit. The dentist will apply either a protective gel to your gums or a rubber shield to protect your gums. Bleach is then applied to the teeth.

At-Home Bleaching from Your Dentist
Your dentist can provide you with a custom-made tray for at-home whitening. In this case, the dentist or orthodontist will give you instructions on how to place the bleaching solution in the tray and for what length of time. This may be a preferred option if you feel more comfortable whitening in your own home at a slower pace, but still with the guidance of a dentist. Out-of-office bleaching can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks.

Over-the-Counter Bleaching Products
You may see different options online or in your local grocery store, such as toothpastes or strips that whiten by bleaching your teeth. The concentration of the bleaching agent in these products is lower than what your dentist would use in the office. If you are thinking about using an over-the-counter bleaching kit, discuss options with your dentist or orthodontist and look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. That means it has been tested to be safe and effective for teeth whitening.

Are There Any Side Effects from Teeth Whitening?

Some people who use teeth whiteners may experience tooth sensitivity. That happens when the peroxide in the whitener gets through the enamel to the soft layer of dentin and irritates the nerve of your tooth. In most cases the sensitivity is temporary. You can delay treatment, then try again.

Overuse of whiteners can also damage the tooth enamel or gums, so be sure to follow directions and talk to your dentist. source/mouthhealthy.org.

With Age Comes Wisdom And Wisdom Teeth

May 16th, 2022

 

 

teeth x-ray and wisdom tooth tooth problems wisdom teeth stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

With age comes wisdom. Specifically, wisdom teeth.

Your mouth goes through many changes in your lifetime. One major dental milestone that usually takes place between the ages of 17 and 21 is the appearance of your third molars. Historically, these teeth have been called wisdom teeth because they come through at a more mature age.

When they come through correctly, healthy wisdom teeth can help you chew. It’s normal to feel a little discomfort when your wisdom teeth appear, but if you have pain, see your dentist immediately.

Room to Grow?

Wisdom teeth can lead to problems if there isn’t enough space for them to surface or they come through in the wrong position. If your dentist says your wisdom teeth are impacted, he or she means they are trapped in your jaw or under your gums.

As your wisdom teeth make their way through your gums, your dentist will be monitoring your mouth for signs of the following:

  • Wisdom teeth that aren’t in the right position can allow food to become trapped. That gives cavity-causing bacteria a place to grow.
  • Wisdom teeth that haven’t come in properly, which can make it difficult to floss between the wisdom teeth and the molars next to them.
  • Wisdom teeth that have partially come through can give bacteria a place to enter the gums and create a place for infection to occur. This may also lead to pain, swelling and stiffness in your jaw.
  • Wisdom teeth that don’t have room to come through are thought by some to crowd or damage neighboring teeth.
  • A wisdom tooth that is impacted can form a cyst on or near the impacted tooth. This could damage the roots of nearby teeth or destroy the bone that supports your teeth.

Why You Might Need to Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

Every patient is unique, but in general, wisdom teeth may need to be removed when there is evidence of changes in the mouth such as:

  • Pain
  • Infection
  • Cysts
  • Tumors
  • Damage to neighboring teeth
  • Gum disease
  • Tooth decay (if it is not possible or desirable to restore the tooth)

Dr. Pamela Johnson may recommend removal of wisdom teeth as part of treatment for braces or other dental care.

Before making any decisions, your dentist or orthodontist will examine your mouth and take an x-ray. Together, you can discuss the best course of treatment.

Keeping Your Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth that are not removed should continue to be monitored because the potential for developing problems later on still exists. As people age, they are at greater risk for health problems—and that includes potential problems with their wisdom teeth. Be sure to, floss around your wisdom teeth and visit your dentist regularly. Regular dental visits allow your dentist to evaluate your wisdom teeth and your overall dental health. -

Foods To Keep Your Teeth And Body Healthy

May 11th, 2022

Nutrition

Photo of teen girl drinking a class of milk

Eating healthy foods helps keep your teeth and body healthy. Don’t eat or drink too many sweets. If you have something sweet, try to eat or drink it with a meal to limit the exposure time to your teeth. That's because certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other oral health problems? Here are some tips.

What to Eat:

Fruits and vegetables. Combined these should be half of what you eat every day.

  • Grains. Make sure at least half of the grains you eat are whole grains, such as oatmeal, whole wheat bread and brown rice.
  • Dairy. Choose low-fat or fat-free dairy foods.
  • Lean proteins. Make lean protein choices, such as lean beef, skinless poultry and fish. Try and vary your protein choices to include eggs, beans, peas and legumes, too. Eat at least 8 oz. of seafood a week.

Snacking tips:

  • Snacking is hard to resist but you can do your mouth a favor by watching the amount of soda, juice or other sweetened beverages you drink.
  • If you want a snack, try and choose something like fruit, low-fat cheese, yogurt or raw vegetables.
  • If you chew gum, make sure it’s sugarless. Certain sugarless gums have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance for helping prevent cavities by strengthening teeth. Look for the ADA Seal on the package.

If you have braces: Good oral hygiene is especially important for people wearing braces. Dr. Pamela Johnson Orthodontist in Willowbrook IL, may recommend avoiding certain foods that could interfere with braces or accidentally bend the wires. These foods may include nuts, popcorn, hard candy, ice and sticky foods like chewing gum, caramel or other chewy candy.   Source/mouthhealthy.org

Orthodontic Treatment Results In A Healthier Mouth

May 9th, 2022

 

 

 

Boy Visiting Dental Clinic For Treatment Of Braces Latin teenage boy with dentist adjusting new elastic bands on braces braces rubber bands stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Braces and orthodontic treatment are used to correct “bad bites,” or malocclusion (teeth that are crowded or crooked). In some cases your teeth may be straight, but your upper and lower jaws may not meet properly. These jaw or tooth alignment problems may be inherited or could result from injury, early or late tooth loss, or thumbsucking.

If you have an abnormal bite Dr. Pamela Johnson, an Orthodontist in Willowbrook IL,  may recommend braces or another orthodontic treatment to straighten out your smile. Correcting the problem can create a nice-looking smile, but more importantly, orthodontic treatment results in a healthier mouth. Not correcting an abnormal bite could result in further oral health problems, including:

  • tooth decay
  • gum disease
  • tooth loss
  • affected speech and/or chewing
  • abnormal wear to tooth enamel
  • jaw problems

Straightening your teeth can be accomplished in different ways. The kind of orthodontic treatment you have will depend on your preference and the options provided by Dr. Pamela Johnson. Traditional braces realign teeth by applying pressure. They usually consist of small brackets cemented to your teeth, connected by a wire, which is periodically tightened by Dr.Johnson to gradually shift your teeth and jaw. The brackets may be metal or tooth colored. Sometimes they are placed behind your teeth. Under the direct supervision of  Dr. Johnson, removable aligners are another option for treating orthodontic problems.

Orthodontic treatment can be provided by Dr Pamela Johnson, an orthodontist, who specializes in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. Dr.Johnsons treatment will depend on the severity of your case.

Since abnormal bites usually become noticeable between the ages of 6 and 12, orthodontic treatment often begins between ages 8 and 14. Treatment that begins while a child is growing helps produce optimal results. That doesn’t mean that adults can’t have braces; healthy teeth can be orthodontically treated at any age.
Treatment plans will vary based on your situation, but most people are in treatment from one to three years. This is followed by a period of wearing a retainer that holds teeth in their new positions. Today’s braces are more comfortable than ever before. Newer materials apply a constant, gentle force to move teeth and usually require fewer adjustments.

While you have braces it’s important to maintain a balanced diet for the health of your teeth. Of course, a healthy diet is always important, but eating too many sugary foods with braces can lead to plaque build-up around your brackets that could permanently stain or damage your teeth. Avoiding foods like popcorn, corn on the cob, chewing gum, whole apples, and other sticky foods is also a good idea. Ask Dr. Pamela Johnson about foods to avoid while you are in treatment. Not all of us are born with beautiful smiles, but with a good oral hygiene routine, and a little help from orthodontics, you can have a beautiful and healthy smile.
At  Pamela Johnson Orthodontic Solutions in Willowbrook IL,we can offer easy to understand treatment options with exceptional outcomes. Call us to schedule your first orthodontic evaluation. - source/mouthhealthy.org

ORTHODONTICS FOR A BEAUTIFUL SMILE

May 2nd, 2022

 

 

 

Image result for small size dental pictures of a family with braces

Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics is the formal name of the dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis, prevention, interception, guidance and correction of bad bites. The purpose of orthodontic treatment is to create a healthy bite—straight teeth that properly meet opposing teeth in the opposite jaw. A good bite makes it easier for you to bite, chew and speak.

If your teeth are crowded, protrusive, spaced too far apart, meet in an abnormal way, or do not meet at all, correction may be recommended. Braces and aligners are the “appliances” Dr. Pamela Johnson,Orthodontist located in Willowbrook IL, most commonly use to guide your teeth into their proper positions. Retainers preserve and stabilize the results of your orthodontic treatment.

In the past, orthodontic treatment was associated with children and teens, but today many adults seek orthodontic treatment to correct long-standing problems, or problems that stem from maturational changes. Dr. Pamela Johnson can help people of any age achieve a healthy and beautiful smile.

For more information, visit My Life. My Smile. My Orthodontist.

Detecting Oral Cancer

April 26th, 2022

By Joana Breckner

A routine visit to my ADA dentist saved my life. I am a four-year survivor of oral cancer. I am married, 47 years old and the mother of two girls, ages 10 and 12. I am not a smoker or drinker, and have been in good health my entire life. In 2000, during a teeth cleaning, my dentist discovered precancerous white spots on my tongue.

The biopsy was benign, but for the next seven years I was monitored by  my doctor. My first tumor, small and contained, was removed in 2007. Four years later, my cancer returned. I underwent a 10-hour surgery removing half my tongue, which was rebuilt with grafts from my forearm, followed up by radiation and chemotherapy. A year later cancer reoccurred on my jugular vein. More surgery, more chemotherapy, more radiation.

Four years later, my story has a happy ending, and by sharing it I hope to raise awareness of oral cancer and screenings. Traditionally, individuals with the highest risk of developing oral cancer have been those who smoke, use tobacco or drink alcohol heavily, but exposure to the human papillomavirus (HPV) is now a significant factor. The fastest-growing oral cancer population is young nonsmokers with HPV.

Currently there is no national program for oral cancer screenings. The American Dental Association states that “just doing ‘opportunistic’ cancer screenings ... would yield tens of thousands of opportunities to catch oral cancer in its early stages.” According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, when oral cancer is found at early stages of development, patients have an 80 to 90 percent survival rate.

Oral Cancer Awareness Month

April 7th, 2022

April Observed as Oral Cancer Awareness Month | OSIYou know your dentist is looking for cavities during regular check-ups, but you may not realize your dentist/orthodontist can check for cancer at the same time. It’s estimated that approximately 51,540 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue in 2018.

Regular visits to your dentist or orthodontist can help you detect such cancers early, and changing a few potentially harmful habits may help reduce your chances of developing them. Read on to find out the top risk factors.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

The sexually transmitted disease is now associated with about 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer (specifically those occurring at the back of the tongue, in or around the tonsils) diagnosed each year in the United States, according to the CDC. People who are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer tend to be younger and nonsmokers. People with HPV-positive cancers have a lower risk of death or recurrence, even though these cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage because it develops in difficult-to-detect areas.

Gender

Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use by men, but says more men of a younger age are being diagnosed with HPV-related forms of oral cancer.

Tobacco

Whether you smoke it or chew it, tobacco use increases your risk dramatically. Smoking can cause oral cancer, as well as cancer in other parts of the body. Pipe smokers are also at a higher risk for developing cancer in their lips. Smokeless tobacco, like chew, can lead to many issues in your mouth, the most serious being cancer of the cheeks, gums, and lips.

Alcohol

According to the American Cancer Society, 7 of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is an average of two drinks a day or more for men and an average of more than one drink a day for women. If you are a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker, your chances of developing oral cancer increase significantly.

Age

Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV-related oral cancers, however, are often diagnosed in people who are younger.

Source: mouthhealthy.org

Safeguard Your Smile - Finding the Right Mouthguard for You

April 7th, 2022

Mouthguard

Mouthguards

Imagine what it would be like if you suddenly lost one or two of your front teeth. Smiling, talking, eating—everything would suddenly be affected. Knowing how to prevent injuries to your mouth and face is especially important if you participate in organized sports or other recreational activities.

Mouthguards, also called mouth protectors, help cushion a blow to the face, minimizing the risk of broken teeth and injuries to your lips, tongue, face or jaw. They typically cover the upper teeth and are a great way to protect the soft tissues of your tongue, lips and cheek lining. “Your top teeth take the brunt of trauma because they stick out more,” says Dr. Thomas Long, a private practice dentist and team dentist for the Carolina Hurricanes professional hockey team. “Your bottom teeth are a little more protected because they are further back.”

When Should You Wear a Mouthguard?

When it comes to protecting your mouth, a mouthguard is an essential piece of athletic gear that should be part of your standard equipment from an early age.

While collision and contact sports, such as boxing, are higher-risk sports for the mouth, any athlete may experience a dental injury in non-contact activities too, such as gymnastics and skating.

Types of Mouthguards

The best mouthguard is one that has been custom made for your mouth by your dentist. However, if you can’t afford a custom-made mouthguard, you should still wear a stock mouthguard or a boil-and-bite mouthguard from the drugstore. Learn more about each option:

  • Custom-made: These are made by your dentist for you personally. They are more expensive than the other versions because they are individually created for fit and comfort.
  • Boil and bite: These mouth protectors can be bought at many sporting goods stores and drugstores and may offer a better fit than stock mouth protectors. They are first softened in water (boiled), then inserted and allowed to adapt to the shape of your mouth. Always follow the manufacturers' instructions.  CustMbite MVP and CustMbite Pro are a boil and bite mouthguards that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • Stock: These are inexpensive and come pre-formed, ready to wear. Unfortunately, they often don’t fit very well. They can be bulky and can make breathing and talking difficult.

Protecting Your Braces

A properly fitted mouthguard may be especially important for people who wear braces or have fixed bridge work. A blow to the face could damage the brackets or other fixed orthodontic appliances. A mouthguard also provides a barrier between the braces and your cheek or lips, which will help you avoid injuries to your gums and cheeks.

Talk to Dr. Pamela Johnson about selecting a mouthguard that will provide the right protection. Although some mouthguards only cover the upper teeth, it may be better to use a mouthguard on the lower teeth if you have braces on these teeth.

If you have a retainer or other removable appliance, do not wear it during any contact sports.

Mouthguard Care and Replacement

Talk to your dentist about when is the right time to replace your mouthguard, but replace it immediately if it shows sign of wear, is damaged or ill fitting. Teens and children may need to replace their mouthguards more often because their mouths are still growing and changing. Between games, it’s important to keep your mouthguard clean and dry. Here are some tips for making sure your mouthguard is always ready to go:

  • Rinse before and after each use or brush with a toothbrush and toothpaste.
  • Regularly clean the mouthguard in cool, soapy water. Then, rinse it thoroughly.
  • During your regular dental/orthodontic checkups, bring your mouthguard for an evaluation. Your dentist may also be able to give it a thorough cleaning.
  • Store and transport the mouthguard in a sturdy container that has vents so it can dry and keep bacteria from growing.
  • Never leave the mouthguard in the sun or in hot water.
  • Check fit and for signs of wear and tear to see if it needs replacing.
  • Some mouthguards have fallen victim to family pets, who see them as chew toys.
  • Store your mouthguard and case somewhere your pet cannot get to it.

Source: mouthhealthy.org

Know the facts when considering orthodontic treatment as an adult

January 6th, 2022

It’s a new year, you have made your resolutions, and on the top of your list is looking (and feeling) healthy!  As a part of looking healthy and with the understanding that on-camera meetings are here to stay, you may be curious about straightening your teeth. You are not alone,  according to a recent study conducted by the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO), adult (18 years+) patients now outweigh teens/kids in treatment.

A common misperception is that you may be too old for orthodontic treatment or your situation is too difficult to consider treatment but this is NOT the case. The deciding factor on whether a patient is a good candidate for treatment is the health of their teeth and gums NOT their age.

If the convenience of taking a selfie and receiving your orthodontic treatment by mail is attractive, you should be aware of the mail-order treatment process and the potential hidden dangers of a one-size-fits-all treatment plan.  An in-person consultation is the best way for you to get the proper diagnosis and treatment which will be customized just for you. Also, being actively monitored by Dr. Johnson throughout your treatment will help to ensure that your treatment goes smoothly and you will be able to have the opportunity to have your questions answered by the treating doctor. Your health history and habits should be discussed with the doctor so that you receive the best treatment possible.

Items to think about when meeting with Dr. Johnson:

  • Fillings
  • Missing Teeth
  • Misshapen or worn teeth
  • Dental disease
  • Periodontal disease
  • Medications
  • Habits like smoking, clenching or grinding teeth, or tongue thrusting

All of these items can affect the outcome of your treatment.  Plus, for some adults to reach optimal dental health, your dentist and orthodontist will work in partnership and may need to call in other dental specialists such as oral surgeons, periodontists, and endodontists.

In short, NO, you are never too old for orthodontic treatment as long as you have healthy teeth and gums. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligned teeth and jaws – and possess the skills and experience to give you your best smile. The best way to achieve a healthy, beautiful smile at any age is to seek out a specialist with Dr. Pamela Johnson

 

https://aaoinfo.org.

The Caregiver’s Guide to Dental Health

November 10th, 2021

The Whole Tooth: Dental Health & Older Adults

Happy National Family Caregiver month!  If you’re one of the 44 million family caregivers in the United States, you’ve got a lot on your mind. However, keeping your loved one’s mouth healthy is important for their dental health, overall health and so much more.

“It’s also about comfort, safety and self-esteem,” says ADA dentist Dr. Judith Jones. “Keeping your mouth and teeth clean can prevent sensitivity or pain in your teeth. In terms of safety, there might be broken teeth, broken partials or unsafe partials they can swallow. And for their self-esteem, it’s important for individuals to have a sense of pride in their appearance and to have good hygiene.”

How much help you give will depend on the individual. If the person in your care can do the basics, let them. Some adults may have physical issues that make them unable to hold a toothbrush. Others may have memory issues, so they forget to brush and floss. People with dementia may need someone to clean their teeth each day and take them to a dentist.

No matter your situation, daily care plus professional care equal the best chances for a healthy mouth. Here are some important mouth care steps for older adults.

  • Brush teeth twice a day for two minutes using a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean between the teeth daily with floss or other between-the-teeth cleaner.
  • Rinse dentures after each meal, brush them daily with denture cleaner and take them out before bedtime and store in water.
  • If the person has dry mouth, an alcohol-free mouthrinse may help. Sipping water, sucking (not chewing) on ice chips and using a humidifier while sleeping can help keep him or her hydrated.
  • Limit snacking and sugary drinks. Healthy foods and drinks such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and water are good for the mouth and the body.
  • Make and keep dental appointments. Even people with dentures need to visit the dentist.
  • Watch for symptoms that could signal larger issues, and make an appointment with the dentist to have them checked out.

You may have questions specific to your own situation, so here are some starting points for different types of care cases. And always feel free to speak with your dentist or your loved one’s dentist for more advice.

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/

Is it necessary to fill a cavity in a baby tooth?

October 20th, 2021

4 Important Facts about Baby Teeth that You Need to Know - Highpoint  Pediatric Dentistry

While all parents know baby teeth eventually fall out, it’s important to keep little teeth healthy because they are the blueprint for your child’s permanent teeth. Treating a cavity in a baby tooth is crucial to ensure the tooth stays in place until it falls out naturally because little teeth save space for, and are the pathway, for permanent teeth. Additionally, baby teeth are important to speech development and maintaining good nutrition by permitting your child to chew properly. If decay in a baby tooth is not treated, it could cause pain, impair speech and potentially damage permanent teeth or cause them to grow in crooked.

Treatment options vary based on the severity of the cavity.

https://mouthmonsters.mychildrensteeth.org

12 Tips for a Healthy Halloween

October 7th, 2021

Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges.

Here's how you can help your family stay healthy and have fun on Halloween.

Time It Right

Eat Halloween candy (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks

Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. Instead have them as a dessert after a meal or a quick study reward with some water after.

Choose Candy Carefully

Avoid hard candy and other sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

Avoid Sticky Situations

Sticky candies cling to your teeth. The stickier candies, like taffy and gummy bears, take longer to get washed away by saliva, increasing the risk for tooth decay.

Have a Plan

It’s tempting to keep that candy around, but your teeth will thank you if you limit your stash. Have your family pick their favorites and donate the rest.  Look for organizations that help you donate candy to troops overseas, like Operation Gratitude, or see if your dentist has a candy take-back program.

Drink More Water

Drinking fluoridated water can help prevent tooth decay. If you choose bottled water, look for kinds that are fluoridated.

Maintain a Healthy Diet

Your body is like a complex machine. The foods you choose as fuel and how often you "fill up" affect your general health and that of your teeth and gums.

Stay Away from Sugary Beverages

This includes soda, sports drinks and flavored waters. When teeth come in frequent contact with beverages that contain sugar, the risk of tooth decay is increased.

Chew Gum with the ADA Seal

Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after meals helps reduce tooth decay, because increased saliva flow helps wash out food and neutralize the acid produced by bacteria. Find one with the ADA Seal for maximum effectiveness.

Brush Twice a Day

Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste. Remember, replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won't do a good job of cleaning your teeth.

Clean Between Your Teeth

Floss your teeth once a day. Decay-causing bacteria get between teeth where toothbrush bristles can't reach. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.  This also helps get rid of bacteria left behind after brushing that causes bad breath.

Find fun-filled Halloween activity sheets and pumpkin stencils in the link below!

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/resources/activity-sheets/halloween

Have a wonderful Halloween season! - Dr. Johnson and staff

www.mouthhealthy.org

3 Things All Athletes Should Do for Their Teeth

September 2nd, 2021

A child plays hockey while wearing a mouthguard

Make a Mouthguard Part of Your Uniform

Helmet? Check. Knee pads? Check. Mouthguard? Check! Mouthguards usually cover your upper teeth and protect your teeth, lips, tongue, face and jaw against injuries, so they need to be part of your uniform in any sport you play.

Wearing a mouthguard regularly becomes second nature. It does not matter what type of mouthguard you choose, just make sure it fits properly.

In fact, many sports won’t let you play without one.  USA Hockey requires all youth players to wear a mouthguard. “The referees have to be able to see it, and it has to be colored,” says Dr. Long, a former college hockey player and team dentist for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes.

 

Sideline Sugary Sports Drinks

If you need to quench your thirst, reach for water instead of a sports drink. The bacteria in your mouth will use the sugar from your sports drink to produce an acid that weakens the hard outer shell of your teeth, which may increase your risk for cavities over time.  This bacteria can sit in your mouth guard and attack your enamel the entire time it's in during play.

 

Brush, Floss, Rinse, Repeat

Practice makes perfect when you’re mastering the skills of any sport, so do the same with your daily dental habits.  An unhealthy tooth is more likely to be damaged if a sports injury happens.  A tooth that has had a lot of decay and a lot of fillings is nowhere near as strong as a tooth that has not had decay and has not had a lot of fillings.

Keep your smile strong by brushing twice a day for two minutes and flossing once a day. Then, in the home stretch of your daily dental routine, use an ADA-Accepted mouthwash.

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/

6 Travel Tips for Your Teeth

June 15th, 2021

Vacation marked on a calendar

The summer is almost here, and we know many of our patients and their families will be traveling this year. Here are some great dental travel tips to keep your summer both fun and healthy!

  1. Schedule a Dental Visit Beforehand

    No one wants to have a dental emergency during vacation. If you can, schedule a checkup with your general dentist and make sure you have seen Dr. Johnson if you are due for an appointment. That way both can check to make sure your teeth and the orthodontic appliances are in good shape.

  2. Have Emergency Contacts Ready

    Have your general dentist and Dr. Johnson's phone number in your phone or their businesses cards in your wallet before leaving for vacation. Many dental emergencies can be solved at home or over the phone.

  3. In Case of an Emergency...

    If you are out of the country and you need to see a dentist immediately, contact your local consulate or U.S. embassy. The concierge at the hotel may give recommendations, but the local consulate or U.S. embassy will provide independent recommendations.

  4. If You Forget Your Toothbrush

    No toothbrush? Rinse vigorously with water or put toothpaste on a clean washcloth or your finger. When you have a chance, go to the nearest drugstore to get a toothbrush with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. If you don't see the seal, get the softest brush you can find.

  5. How to Properly Pack Your Toothbrush

    Letting your toothbrush air dry is the best way to avoid bacteria and keeping it clean at home. However, when traveling, it's more important to keep your toothbrush clean and out of contact with other things than to air dry. Use resealable plastic bags to keep your toothbrush separate from everything else in your luggage. Once you arrive, then you can take it out to air dry.

  6. Pack ADA Approved Gum

    Chewing sugarless gum can help relieve ear pressure during a flight – and help keep cavities at bay on vacation. Research shows that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after a meal can help prevent cavities. That’s because it gets saliva flowing, which helps wash away cavity-causing bacteria.

www.mouthhealthy.org/

National Children's Dental Health Month

February 4th, 2021

This year's theme for National Children's Dental Health Month is "Water, Nature's Drink." Developing good habits at an early age and scheduling regular dental visits help children get a good start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

And to celebrate at Johnson Orthodontics, we're hosting a coloring contest! Come grab a coloring sheet in our office, create your masterpiece, and return it by March 15, 2021. You can either return it in person or mail it to us. Three will be chosen randomly to receive a mystery gift card! Good luck and have fun!

Office Update

November 9th, 2020

Dear Family and Friends,

I hope you and your family are doing well during these uncertain times. I wanted to reassure you that Johnson Orthodontics understands your worries. To date, our office has had 0 COVID cases. Our policies and procedures have worked very well and we are strictly following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), American Dental Association (ADA) and American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) guidelines in order to keep our patients and staff safe.

While some of our polices may appear overly cautious, we remain committed to doing our very best to ensure your safety. We appreciate your understanding and cooperation with these procedures. As oral healthcare professionals, we are leaders in infection control and preventing the spread of disease. We have always had the precautions of using masks, goggles, gloves, sterile instruments and devices as well as handwashing, cleaning and disinfecting environmental surfaces.

During this pandemic, we have increased our efforts to keep our office sterile by adding plexiglass barriers and using the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) such as face shields and gowns. We have also purchased a medical grade air purifier. We practice social distancing by seating our patients every other chair in the office since we reopened six months ago and we do not allow more than a few individuals in our reception area to prevent overcrowding. Our office also encourages a “one way in, one way out” policy to reduce the possibility of crowded pathways. Lastly, we have included the option of virtual consultations for new patients, emergencies, and Invisalign patients through our website.

While check-in may involve a few extra steps, it has helped ensure everyone’s safety. We ask screening and triage questions at the door and check temperatures of patients and staff. We understand that when you come to our office on a more regular basis, it can feel unneeded and repetitive to answer the questions and have your temperature checked. However, it appears to have helped us remain a safe and healthy place for our families.

The top priority of the office is our patients’ health. With these procedures in place, we have had minimal disruption in our services and 0 COVID cases in the office. This would not have been possible without the understanding, trust, and cooperation of our wonderful families. So a big heartfelt thank you to all of our patients and families for keeping everyone healthy!

With best wishes for your family’s health and safety,

 

Dr. Pamela Johnson

Candy You Can Eat With Braces

October 22nd, 2020

Halloween is almost here! We know things may be different this year, but we're all going to indulge in some candy-goodness at the end of this month. If you're worried you can't have candy with braces, we have great news for you! Enjoying good candy with braces is still an option. However, there are certain candies that you want to avoid because they have a higher chance of damaging your braces and setting back your orthodontic treatment process.

Candies to avoid:
- Caramels
- Taffy
- Hard candy
- Chewy candy
- Jellybeans
- Licorice
- Bubble gum
- Suckers
- Sour candy
- Popcorn
- Nuts

Now you're probably thinking well what can I eat? Softer, melt-in-your-mouth candies are better and less risky when you have braces. So here are the candies you can enjoy in moderation.

Candies you can eat:
- Chocolate (without caramel or nuts)
- KitKats
- Reese's Peanut Butter Cups
- 3 Musketeers
- Marshmallows
- Cookies

Remember, any candy in excessive amounts can be harmful to your teeth and braces. The candy can accumulate around your braces and lead to white marks (decalcification), cavities or gum disease. Make sure to brush your teeth well after having your sugary snacks! Happy Halloween!

source: aaoinfo.org

Donate to the Local Food Drive

October 19th, 2020

The Village Of Willowbrook and the Willowbrook Police Department have partnered with HCS Family Services to run a food drive this week!

We will be contributing to the food drive to help local families and wanted to see if you’ll join us. You can drop off your donations at the 3 locations mentioned on the flyer below, or you can bring them to Johnson Orthodontics by Thursday, October 22nd, as we will be dropping our donations off on Friday.

Myths about Orthodontic Treatment

October 15th, 2020

There are common myths about orthodontic treatment that are spread on a daily basis. We'd like to debunk these misconceptions.

1. Anyone who provides braces or aligners is an orthodontist.

False. Some general dentists or online companies can offer braces or aligners, but only after taking additional years of advanced schooling at an accredited residency can a dentist call themselves an orthodontic specialist. That's why it is important to see a specialist, like Johnson Orthodontics, to straighten your teeth as they will possess the skills, knowledge, and experience to give you the best smile.

2. Orthodontists are expensive.

False. Orthodontists customize their patients' treatment plans and as a result, the fees reflect the complexity of each case. For simple cases that take a short amount of time, to difficult ones that could take years, the benefits of having a professional provide orthodontic care will be well worth it. Johnson Orthodontics provides complimentary consultations and flexible payment plans, and we are willing to work with our patients in order to help them get their best smile.

3. Orthodontic treatment takes several years.

It depends. Orthodontic treatment requires time, pressure, and cooperation. Each case is different as simple cases may only take a few months to treat while difficult ones can take years. In order to straighten your teeth, Johnson Orthodontics will add an appliance to put constant pressure over time to move your teeth into position. Treatment also requires cooperation from the patient in continuing good dental hygiene and avoiding foods that could damage the appliance. Rest assured, Johnson Orthodontics has the training, experience, and skill to deliver an excellent result in the shortest time possible.

4. Orthodontic treatment is purely cosmetic.

False. While improved appearance is the most obvious result, there are many benefits to having orthodontic treatment done. When your teeth and jaws are aligned biting, chewing, and speaking could improve. There are also important health benefits. Crooked teeth allow plaque to build up which leads to cavities, gum disease, or bleeding gums. Teeth that stick out are also more likely to be injured or fractured and can lead to teeth grinding and chipping.

5. Orthodontists only offer metal braces.

False. Orthodontists have a full range of appliances besides metal braces to straighten your teeth. Here at Johnson Orthodontics we offer a variety including clear braces and Invisalign® for both teens and adults. Rather than pressuring a patient into using a particular product, orthodontists are craftsmen with a variety of tools at their disposal to help you get your new smile.

6. Orthodontic treatment is just for kids.

False. As mentioned earlier, we have Invisalign® for teens and adults, and we have other products that can be used to help adjust adult teeth. Age is not a concern when it comes to getting a healthy, beautiful smile. Patients of all ages can benefit from orthodontic treatment.

Source: aaoinfo.org

National Stop Bullying Day and #BullyingBites

October 14th, 2020

October is Orthodontic Health Month and today is National Stop Bullying Day, and the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) is calling all 19,000 member orthodontists to come together to fight against bullying.

Teeth have been reported as one of the common features targeted by bullies, and orthodontists like Dr. Johnson are standing up and encouraging their patients to do the same because #BullyingBites.

70% of Americans admit to feeling self-conscious about their teeth.

57% of Americans cover their mouths when they laugh due to insecurity over their teeth.

70% of young people say they have seen bullying in their schools.

We hope that you join us in spreading this anti-bullying message. Follow our Facebook and Instagram and view AAO's website to learn more about #BullyingBites.

Source: aaoinfo.org

What Your Orthodontist Wants You to Know During This Time

October 13th, 2020

We know these are uncertain times, but we wanted to let you know our office is open and safe for you to come in. Our mission is to keep our patients and staff safe while providing excellent orthodontic care. We want to reassure you that we are taking all precautions to protect everyone. Here are a few things we want you to know:

1. We are taking many more precautions to protect our patients and staff.

  • Wearing the proper PPE
  • Practicing social distancing etiquette
  • Cleaning and disinfecting more than ever before
  • Asking screening questions and checking temperatures at the front door

2. We continue to stay on top of all safety protocols.

Here at Johnson Orthodontics we continue to educate ourselves on the safety protocols as well as update our infection control protocols to ensure we align with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and all other applicable guidelines.

3. Dentists and orthodontic specialists have always been leaders in infection control and preventing the spread of diseases.

As oral health professionals, we are leaders in safely practicing with blood borne pathogens and respiratory pathogens. We are taking all the CDC recommendations and implementing them in our offices.

4. Your oral health is representative of your overall health.

We use appliances such as springs, coils and memory wires that apply continuous pressure to your teeth and jaw in order to straighten your teeth. Because of this, it is important that adjustments are made to the appliances in a timely manner and that we monitor the movement of your teeth. Also, it's important to know that leaving misaligned teeth untreated could lead to other dental problems.

 

 

 

Why Filing Teeth Yourself is a Bad Idea

October 8th, 2020

If you, your friends, or family use TikTok you may have seen a new trend where people use a nail file to grind their teeth down to make them more even.

Don't do this!

Unlike fingernails which grow back, teeth are permanent. When you attempt to file your teeth at home, you're chipping away at the protective layer of enamel and damaging your teeth. Losing the enamel could lead to tooth sensitivity or even loss.

If you have uneven teeth, come to Johnson Orthodontics. An orthodontist is trained to know the best teeth practices. As an expert, they can determine why your teeth are uneven and can inform you if you are a good candidate for a professional filing, called enameloplasty, or if another type of orthodontic treatment would be more beneficial.

source: aaoinfo.org

Three Facts About Taking Your Child To The Orthodontist

September 10th, 2020

 

Ever wonder when you should take your child to the orthodontist? Below are three reasons you should schedule an orthodontic consultation.

#1: You notice something doesn't look quite right.

Parents often recognize that something isn’t quite right about their child’s teeth or jaws. The teeth may not be fitting together properly.Your child may have difficulty chewing or biting. There may be mouth breathing or teeth grinding issues. When you notice something not quite right, it’s time to get it checked out.Impacted teeth or severely delay eruption of teeth can prevent the adult teeth from growing in correctly. The orthodontist may need an x-ray to see what's below the surface.

#2: Age 7 is the magic number!

Adult teeth start erupting between the age of 6 and 7. Extra teeth, missing teeth or impacted teeth need to be noticed early.

Early orthodontic treatment may prevent more serious problems from developing or getting worse. For example, a palatal expander can widen the upper jaw while your child is still young and the bones are more pliable. Orthodontic treatment can improve sleep disorders such as sleep apnea. Sometimes baby teeth need to be removed in order to guide the adult permanent teeth into a better position.

#3: You don't need a dentist to tell you it's time to see an orthodontist.

A referral might not be made if the dentist isn’t evaluating the bite correctly. Why wait? New patient exams are easy and fun for your child. No referral is needed!

Will My Teeth Stay Where My Orthodontist Moved Them?

August 13th, 2020

Change is a natural part of life. Just as our bodies change throughout our whole life, our teeth change too. We start out with no teeth, then get baby teeth, and shed those in favor of permanent teeth. Sometimes there are problems with tooth placement and jaw positions. That’s where Dr. Johnson is called in to bring about a change for the better, and transform misaligned teeth and jaws into a healthy and beautiful smile.

After orthodontic treatment is complete the most reliable way to keep your teeth where Dr. Johnson moved them is by wearing your retainers as prescribed. Your teeth will not stay where Dr.Johnson moved them unless you do. Changes in tooth position are a lifelong and naturally occurring phenomenon, and to maintain the result created by your orthodontic treatment, retainers must be worn. While small changes after treatment concludes are normal, retainers prevent teeth from going back to their original positions.

When treatment is complete, there is a “settling in” period; teeth adjust as you bite, chew, swallow and speak – actions that all place forces on your teeth. These small changes in tooth position are not a failure of orthodontic treatment, but are a natural process. If your retainer is not worn as prescribed, however, large changes occur instead. Large changes are disappointing to the patient, and to the orthodontist. If you are in retainers, and should you notice an unwanted change in your bite or your smile, or if you should lose a removable retainer or damage a fixed retainer (bonded in behind teeth), contact our office right away. Don’t give teeth an opportunity to shift. Commit to wearing retainers as prescribed by Dr. Johnson and limit undesirable changes!

Call Dr. Johnson office for more information 630-887-1188!

 

source:aaoinfo.org

Will I Need to Wear Retainers After Treatment?

August 3rd, 2020

Whether you’re thinking about orthodontic treatment, or currently undergoing treatment, you may be wondering, “Will I need to wear retainers after treatment?” The answer is yes, and here’s why. Getting straight teeth is only half the battle; the other half is keeping them straight, and that is where retainers come in.

Changes in tooth position are a lifelong and naturally occurring phenomenon, and to maintain the result created by your orthodontic treatment, retainers must be worn. While small changes after treatment concludes are normal, retainers prevent teeth from going back to their original positions.

Why are retainers needed?

Retainers are prescribed for two reasons: first, to allow the bone that holds teeth to rebuild after teeth have moved, and second, to maintain the healthy new positions of teeth after active orthodontic treatment ends. Your body changes your whole life, and your teeth change too.

Are there different retainer options?

Yes, there are two general kinds of retainers: removable (put in and removed by the patient) and fixed (placed and removed by the orthodontist)Both types of retainers hold teeth in their new positions after “active” orthodontic treatment is completed. This allows newly formed bone to mature around the teeth.

Two common removable retainers:

  1.   Wire retainers are made of wire and a plastic-like material. The part of the retainer that covers the roof of the mouth or goes behind the lower front teeth is plastic and wires help told the teeth in place.
  2.   Clear retainers are transparent trays made of a plastic-like material that are exact replicas of the teeth.

The orthodontist will teach you how to insert, remove and take care of a removable retainer.

fixed retainer consists of a thin, custom-fitted wire that is bonded to the tongue-side of upper or lower teeth.

How long will I have to wear them?

As long as you want to keep your teeth straight, many patients wear retainers nightly for life.  Wearing retainers becomes part of your oral hygiene routine: brush and floss before bed, and wear retainers at night for a lifetime.

 

source: aaoinfo.org

Is There a Benefit to Early Treatment?

July 23rd, 2020

Timing is everything – even when it comes to your child’s orthodontic treatment. “Early” treatment, also called “interceptive” treatment, means treatment that is performed while some baby teeth are still present.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that your child’s first check-up with an orthodontist be performed when an orthodontic problem is first recognized, but no later than age 7. Why age 7? By then, your child has enough permanent teeth for an orthodontist to evaluate the developing teeth and the jaws, which in turn can provide a wealth of information. AAO orthodontists are trained to spot subtle problems even in young children.

There are generally three outcomes of an initial check-up:

  • No treatment is expected to be necessary.
  • Treatment may be needed in the future, so the child will be followed periodically while the face and jaws continue to grow.
  • There is a problem that lends itself to early treatment.

While there are many orthodontic problems that orthodontists agree are best treated after all permanent teeth have come in, early treatment can be in a patient’s best interests if their problem is one that could become more serious over time if left untreated. The goal of early treatment is to intercept the developing problem, eliminate the cause, guide the growth of facial and jaw bones, and provide adequate space for incoming permanent teeth. A patient may require a second course of treatment after all permanent teeth have come in to move those teeth into their best positions.

The kinds of problems orthodontists may recommend treating while a child still has some baby teeth include:

Early Treatment | Houston Orthodontics | Houston TX

  • Underbites – when the lower front teeth are ahead of the upper front teeth
  • Crossbites – when the jaw shifts to one side
  • Very crowded teeth
  • Excessively
  • spaced teeth
  • Extra or missing teeth
  • Teeth that meet abnormally, or don’t meet at all
  • Thumb-, finger-, or pacifier- sucking that is affecting the teeth or jaw growth

Some of these orthodontic problems are inherited, while others may result from accidents, dental disease, or abnormal swallowing.

Early orthodontic treatment can take many forms. The orthodontist could prescribe a fixed or removable “appliance” – a device used to move teeth, change the position of the jaw, or hold teeth in place in order to bring about desirable changes. Sometimes no appliances are necessary. Rather, removal of some baby teeth may help the permanent teeth erupt better. The extractions will be timed to take best advantage of a patient’s growth and development.

Regardless of how treatment goals are reached, the bottom line is that some orthodontic problems may be easier to correct if they are found and treated early. Waiting until all the permanent teeth have come in, or until facial growth is nearly complete, may make correction of some problems more difficult.

To give your child the best opportunity for a healthy, beautiful smile call to make a consultation appointment today 630-887-1188!. No referral needed! . Dr. Johnson can alert you to potential problems and recommend treatment when it is most appropriate for your child. Remember, timing is everything.

 

source:aaoinfo.org

3 Reasons to Take Your Child to the Orthodontist Today

July 20th, 2020

 

Wondering when it’s the right time to take your child to the orthodontist? Here are three reasons you should get an orthodontist appointment for your kiddo scheduled now.

#1: You may notice something appears off but there are also some things the untrained eye won’t see.

Parents are often the first to recognize that something isn’t quite right about their child’s teeth or jaws. You may notice your child’s teeth not fitting together, difficulty chewing or biting, mouth breathing or other issues. When you notice something not quite right, it’s time to get it checked out. Sometimes it’s more than meets the eye. ⅔ of what goes on in your mouth happens below the surface. Your child may have impacted canines, preventing adult teeth from erupting properly. Let an orthodontist take a look and see what is below the surface with an x-ray.   You do not have to wait for your general dentist to refer you because a referral is not needed to schedule an initial appointment with an orthodontist!

#2: The earlier, the better. Take them by age 7! 

By age 7, your child has enough permanent teeth for an orthodontist to evaluate if a problem exists or is developing. Most orthodontists take x-rays and photos to evaluate any concerns or potential problems with permanent teeth – such as extra teeth, missing teeth or teeth coming into the wrong positions.

Some problems lend themselves to early treatment and may prevent more serious problems from developing or intercept any issues from getting worse. For example, your child may benefit from a palatal expander which will widen the upper jaw while they are still young and the bone is still pliable – saving them from more costly and einvasive orthodontic work down the road. Orthodontia also has been shown to improve sleep disorders such as sleep apnea. Sometimes baby teeth can be gently removed to guide the other permanent teeth into a better position.  Consult with your orthodontist to learn more.

#3: You don’t need a dentist referral.

Parents may assume that their dentist will make a referral to an orthodontist when the time is right. A referral might not happen if the dentist isn’t evaluating the bite.

Call Johnson Orthodontist for a consultation 630-887-1188 !

source:aaoinfo.org

7 Common Bite Problems in Children and Adults

April 16th, 2020

Your bark may be worse than your bite, but your bite is a very important part of your oral health. In orthodontics, “bite” refers to the way upper and lower teeth come together. A bad bite, called a “malocclusion,” happens when teeth meet improperly, or they don’t meet at all. While each individual bite problem is unique, there are seven broad types of bite problems that are common in children and adults.

1. Crossbite

When upper teeth fit inside of lower teeth. Can be caused by misalignment of teeth (including baby teeth) or a misalignment of the bone; can affect a single tooth or groups of teeth.

Possible consequences if not corrected: The jaw shifts to one side; lopsided jaw growth; wearing down of outer layer of the tooth called “enamel”.

Posterior crossbite: If the back teeth are affected, upper teeth are to the inside of bottom teeth.

common bite problems: posterior crossbite

Anterior crossbite: If the front teeth are in crossbite, the top teeth are behind the bottom teeth.

common bite problems: anterior crossbite

 

2. Underbite

The lower jaw sits in front of the upper jaw.

Possible consequences if not corrected: Face has “bull dog” appearance; tooth wear; stress on jaw joints.

common bite problems: underbite

 

 

 

 

3. Open bite

Anterior open bite: Occurs when the back teeth are together, and the upper and lower front teeth do not overlap. This can result from excessive sucking, tongue thrusting or mouth breathing.

Posterior open bite: Occurs when the front teeth meet, but the back teeth do not.

Possible consequences if not corrected: Swallowing problems; tongue pushes through teeth when swallowing. Possible speech problems.

common bite problems - open bite

 

 

 

 

 

4. Deep bite

When the bite is closed, the upper front teeth cover the bottom teeth too much.

Possible consequences if not corrected: Upper teeth can bite into lower gums; lower teeth can bite into the roof of the mouth. Possible gum disease, early enamel wear.

common bite problems: deep bite

 

 

 

 

5. Crowding

Insufficient space for the teeth. This can be a result of big teeth or inadequate space in the jaw or both. This may result in teeth that overlap, are rotated, or take on a crooked/staggered appearance.

Possible consequences if not corrected: Hard to clean; possible cavities, especially in between the teeth; gum disease.

common bite problems: crowding

 

6. Spacing

Too much space between teeth. It can result from missing teeth, undersized teeth, oversized jaws, or a combination of these conditions.

Possible consequences if not corrected: Food gets stuck in open areas. Possible cavities, gum disease.

common bite problems: spacing

 

 

 

 

 

7. Protrusion

Front teeth that stick out (“buck” teeth). Teeth may appear protrusive because the upper jaw is too far forward, the lower jaw is too far back, the teeth grew in at an angle, or a combination of these conditions. Sometimes people who have protrusive front teeth also have a deep bite.

Possible consequences if not corrected: Upper teeth are prone to accidental breaking; hard to comfortably close the mouth and lips, leading to dried out oral tissues followed by tooth decay. Speech problems. Long, narrow face.

common bite problems: protrusion

 

 

 

 

The fact is that if any of these common bite problems exist in a child’s mouth, they likely will not self-correct. Untreated problems tend to get worse with time. Many times, the bite problems are best treated while the child is still growing, so make an appointment with an orthodontist today.  You don’t need to wait until your dentist refers you.

The goal of orthodontic treatment is to create a healthy bite. When teeth and jaws line up in the right way, the force created to bite, or chew food is evenly distributed. A healthy bite is important for clear speech.

 

 

source:aaoinfo.org

My Orthodontist’s Office Is Closed, What Does That Mean for My Treatment?

March 23rd, 2020

Image result for calm down cartoon images

Given the outbreak of COVID-19, your orthodontist may have made the difficult, but important, decision to postpone any non-emergent appointments. You can be assured that this decision was not made lightly but was made to protect patients, staff and families.

Given the closure, you may have a few questions.

Will this delay my treatment?

We know part of successful orthodontic treatment is showing up for your appointments. If that’s not an option under these unusual circumstances, it’s okay. Don’t panic. Though your appointments are scheduled out to achieve maximum success, this hiccup shouldn’t have much of an impact on your overall treatment plan. Given the situation, your orthodontist will work hard to get your treatment plan back on track when they reopen.

You can help keep treatment on track by following your orthodontist’s directions, avoiding hard and sticky foods and keeping your teeth clean.  With limited appointments available, now is not the time to be breaking brackets, and keeping your teeth clean will ensure the best possible result.

What now?

Make sure to stay in contact with your orthodontist about when they plan to reopen and get any appointments you’re going to miss rescheduled. For many offices, information regarding this is available on practices’ Facebook pages and/or websites.

A timeline as to when they reopen may be up-in-the-air, but you can rest assured they are making decisions with your best interest in mind.

My orthodontist said they will continue “essential dental care.” What does that mean? 

If you have an urgent need during this time, such as pain or injury, your orthodontist will likely be available for emergency appointments. Please contact their office to determine the best course of action for your specific situation.

There’s a lot of uncertainty right now, but what’s one thing we know for sure? 

Your orthodontist Dr. Johnson looks forward to seeing you back in our office soon!

call our office Johnson Orthodontics 630-887-1188 !

source:aaoinfo.org

How Orthodontics Works: Braces

March 17th, 2020

Image result for dental model with braces

Successful orthodontic treatment depends on three things – pressure, time and cooperation. Braces – a fixed orthodontic appliance typically comprised of brackets, bands and wires – put pressure on teeth to gradually move them into the correct position over time. Patient cooperation is needed by keeping teeth clean, avoiding food items that break the brackets, limiting sugary drinks, visiting the general dentist every 3-6 months and wearing elastics as prescribed by the orthodontist.

Patients with braces typically visit the orthodontist every six-to-ten-weeks, until teeth are aligned properly. These maintenance visits ensure teeth are moving correctly and allow your orthodontist to adjust treatment and tooth movement as needed.

Depending on the complexity of the case, a short-term touch up can take just a few months, while comprehensive treatment including bite correction, could last several years.

Other appliances and tools – such as a palatal expandertemporary anchorage devices (TADs), rubber bands – may also be incorporated in your treatment to help speed up the process or improve the result.

After teeth are in the correct position, the braces and other appliances will be removed. Patients are often fitted for a removable/and or permanent retainer to help teeth stay put for years to come.

But aren’t braces old school?

While braces are often considered the traditional approach, there’s a reason the appliance has been a trusted treatment option for decades – they work. Especially for complex cases. Why? Well, because braces are a fixed appliance, they allow for greater control and more detailed tooth movement.

 

source:aaoinfo.org

Is There a Benefit to Early Treatment?

February 25th, 2020

Timing is everything – even when it comes to your child’s orthodontic treatment. “Early” treatment, also called “interceptive” treatment, means treatment that is performed while some baby teeth are still present.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that your child’s first check-up with an orthodontist be performed when an orthodontic problem is first recognized, but no later than age 7. Why age 7? By then, your child has enough permanent teeth for an orthodontist to evaluate the developing teeth and the jaws, which in turn can provide a wealth of information. AAO orthodontists are trained to spot subtle problems even in young children.

There are generally three outcomes of an initial check-up:

  • No treatment is expected to be necessary.
  • Treatment may be needed in the future, so the child will be followed periodically while the face and jaws continue to grow.
  • There is a problem that lends itself to early treatment.

While there are many orthodontic problems that orthodontists agree are best treated after all permanent teeth have come in, early treatment can be in a patient’s best interests if their problem is one that could become more serious over time if left untreated. The goal of early treatment is to intercept the developing problem, eliminate the cause, guide the growth of facial and jaw bones, and provide adequate space for incoming permanent teeth. A patient may require a second course of treatment after all permanent teeth have come in to move those teeth into their best positions.

The kinds of problems orthodontists may recommend treating while a child still has some baby teeth include:

  • Underbites – when the lower front teeth are ahead of the upper front teeth
  • Crossbites – when the jaw shifts to one side
  • Very crowded teeth
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extra or missing teeth
  • Teeth that meet abnormally, or don’t meet at all
  • Thumb-, finger-, or pacifier- sucking that is affecting the teeth or jaw growth

Some of these orthodontic problems are inherited, while others may result from accidents, dental disease, or abnormal swallowing.

Early orthodontic treatment can take many forms. The orthodontist could prescribe a fixed or removable “appliance” – a device used to move teeth, change the position of the jaw, or hold teeth in place in order to bring about desirable changes. Sometimes no appliances are necessary. Rather, removal of some baby teeth may help the permanent teeth erupt better. The extractions will be timed to take best advantage of a patient’s growth and development.

Regardless of how treatment goals are reached, the bottom line is that some orthodontic problems may be easier to correct if they are found and treated early. Waiting until all the permanent teeth have come in, or until facial growth is nearly complete, may make correction of some problems more difficult.

Dr. Pamela Johnson can alert you to potential problems and recommend treatment when it is most appropriate for your child. Remember, timing is everything.

Call our office for your consultation 630-887-1188!

 

Source: aaoinfo.org

National Orthodontic Month and National Prevention Bullying Month

October 9th, 2019

Teeth are the number one feature bullies focus in on – with space between teeth, missing teeth and shape or color of teeth coming in as some of the top features targeted.

“It’s time … it’s time to make it stop,” said Kirk Smalley, founder of Stand for the Silent, referring to bullying in general.

Stand for the Silent has fast become one of the leading and most effective anti-bullying organizations by reaching more than 1,505,000 kids in nearly 1,500 schools. The mission is simple – bring awareness to bullying and the real devastation it causes.

Students, start making a difference today with these four steps:

1. Educate yourself and your peers.

Stand for the Silent found when students tell a trusted adult about bullying, they believe things only get better 18% of the time.

Thousands of incidents and tragedies reveal school administrators cannot intervene and prevent incidents from happening if they do not know about them. It takes a team effort. Students, teachers, parents, community members and social media community members need to be equipped with awareness and tools to get the right information to the right people at the right place at the right time, so they can make it stop.

You are somebody. You can be a hero.

2. Practice empathetic awareness.

Become part of a culture of caring. Step back and strive to understand other people’s emotions and perspectives, as well as how they may respond to certain situations. Don’t just sit back when you notice something. You have the power to intervene. Stand for the Silent teaches us that the fear of getting involved is temporary, but the regret you have for not is permanent.

3. Pledge to be the change.

Take the Stand for the Silent pledge, “From this day forward, I promise to respect those around me as well as respect myself. I am somebody, and I can make a difference. I can make another feel loved. I can be the helping hands that leads another back to the path of hope and aspiration. I will not stand silent as others try to spread hatred through my community. Instead, I pledge to lift up those victims and show them that their life matters. I will be the change, because I am somebody!”

4. Start your own chapter.

Choose to stand for the silent by starting a chapter at your own school. Have all members signs a pledge card, find an adult sponsor, vote to appoint officers, create a name and mission, determine a meeting location and meeting times. Follow this more detailed step-by-step guide to get started.

The bottom line – you are somebody, and you can make a difference.

Stand for the Silent runs solely off donations from those who support its mission. Help them reach 100,000 more kids by making a donation at gofundme.com/help-sfts-reach-100000-more-kids. Interested in sponsoring a Stand fort the Silent presentation at a school near you? Learn more at standforthesilent.org/schools/host-a-presentation.

For National Bullying Prevention Month and National Orthodontic Health Month, AAO challenged it’s 19,000 member orthodontists to come together in the fight against bullying. Orthodontists worldwide are pledging to stand for the silent and encouraging their patients to do the same.

Together, we can set it ALL straight.

Source: aaoinfo.org

Holiday Foods can be tricky for Braces

October 7th, 2015

While last generation's mark of adolescence—braces—has mercifully evolved into an accessory for people of all ages, the long list of treatment-prolonging foods remains unchanged.

Today's braces are more visually appealing and less painful, and wearers don't have to make as many visits to the orthodontist. More than half of teen-agers recently surveyed about their braces report that they are not self-conscious about them. More than a quarter of them say their braces make them look cool.

But foods on the "don't" list, such as nuts, popcorn, hard candy, licorice and caramel, are just as appealing to adults as they are to kids. With one of every five orthodontic patients older than age 18, the holidays present a challenge for an entirely new group of revelers.

Although adults may not include bobbing for apples as an activity at holiday parties, orthodontic patients won't be able to enjoy that bowl of mixed nuts commonly served as an accompaniment during cocktail hour.

The same goes for those caramel-nut taffy apples so artfully displayed at the table's center, brownies with walnuts and pecan pie on the dessert menu.

However, a little awareness and creativity in the kitchen can result in substitutions everyone can enjoy such as pumpkin, parfait, ice cream, fruit cups, gelatin and thinly sliced apples dipped in yogurt or creamy chocolate sauce.

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that orthodontic patients brush and floss after eating sweets. Some dentists recommend brushing within five minutes after eating anything, especially after a meal, and having a travel toothbrush on hand when dining away from home.

Perfect Bite, Pretty Face?

September 10th, 2015

The appearance of a person's bite affects how their attractiveness, personality and intelligence is rated by other adults, according to a study.

A study published in the November 2011 edition of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics asked 889 people to evaluate photos that had been manipulated to show either a normal bite or one of six imperfect bites, called occlusion or malocclusion in the dental world.

“The ratings of attractiveness, intelligence, conscientiousness, agreeableness and extraversion differed significantly depending on the occlusion status depicted,” the report said.

Those with an underbite were rated least attractive, intelligent and extraverted. Females with an imperfect bite were rated more favorably than males. Younger and more educated respondents were more critical in their evaluations than older, less educated respondents.

Drs. Jase A. Olsen, a private practitioner in Southern Pines, N.C., and Marita Rohr Inglehart, associate professor in the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry conducted the study.

"Judgments that are negatively influenced by the effects of malocclusion might leave those without a normal occlusion at a social disadvantage and professionally handicapped," the study notes.

The study also quotes earlier research showing that "attractive" people were perceived to be more intelligent and socially competent, to have a more positive personality, to have better social interactions and to receive more favorable professional ratings.

In addition, the study quotes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination III from 1988-91, which showed that 57 percent to 59 percent of adults had some degree of an imperfect bite.

Although that study is two decades old, it still provides the most current prevalence data for malocclusion among U.S. adults.

The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics is the official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists.

© 2015 American Dental Association. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission from the American Dental Association.

Back to School with braces

September 3rd, 2015

Going back to school with braces will be a new experience for many of you. The good news is that you are certainly not alone. A lot of patients prefer to get their braces on during the summer months. Just look around and you will see many new smiles under construction at your school!
Here are a few tips to help you transition into the school year while staying on target with your orthodontic treatment goals:
1. Remember to avoid crunchy and chewy foods at lunch. Also, be sure to cut questionable food into small bite size pieces and chew very carefully with your back teeth.
2. Take a couple of minutes after lunch to brush your teeth to be certain you don’t have food trapped in your braces.
3. Scheduling your adjustment appointments in advance will improve your chances of getting after school appointments.
4. If you are wearing rubber bands, be sure you have them with you and stay on the schedule we have given you.
5. If you are wearing a retainer, be sure to bring your retainer case to school. That is one of the most common places that patients lose their retainers!
6. As tempting as it is in class and while studying, avoid chewing on pencils or even holding them between the teeth as it can place a large amount of pressure on the teeth. This can cause teeth to shift or crack, and can even break dental work.

The Downers Rebels Take 3rd in ASA Northern National Tournament

August 6th, 2014

Submitted by Dave Bernhard

The goal of any fastpitch softball team is to play its very best at the end of a season. The Downers Grove Rebels 14U “A” team did just that, placing 3rd out of 37 teams in the ASA Northern National Tournament in Bowling Green, Kentucky on July 24-27.

“We finished playing our best ball — pulling offense, defense and pitching all together at the most opportune time — and were able to string together a great run at the ASA Nationals”, Rebels 14U head coach Dave Bernhard Jr. said.

“The tournament success was a total team effort. Each member of the team did not simply contribute; rather each and every player did something outstanding to play a key role,” said Bernhard, whose travel teams have won more than 75 percent of its games over the past five years. “To see the girls come together and play so well on the national stage was really something special.”

The performance capped a season that saw the Rebels finish with a 48-15-1 record during the spring and summer season. Combined with the fall season, the 14U “A” Rebels put a 61-17-1 mark into the book. Of the 15 losses in the summer, eight were by only one run. Separate winning streaks of 19 games and 13 games were included in the summer season.

In the ASA National Tournament the Rebels dominated their first six opponents, outscoring them 59-7 — the highest scoring differential of teams through their first six games. Additionally, the seven runs allowed were the fewest among the 37 teams. The Rebels shut out three opponents, the second most among tournament teams, while the 59 runs scored were also second highest.

Before dropping their final two games to the eventual first- and second-place finishers, the Rebels had a team batting average of .387 and a team ERA of 1.31. For the tournament, the Rebels committed only 10 errors in eight games. In each of their six victories, the Rebels either won the game in their last at-bat or ended the game in their final at-bat via the run rule.

The third-place national finish capped yet another outstanding season for the Rebels and added to tournament trophies already earned. One week earlier the Rebels won the Summer Spectacular Tournament in Romeoville to match a first-place finish at the USSSA World Series Qualifier in Hodgkins in May.

The 14U “A” Rebels battled injuries, illnesses and personal challenges throughout the season, but balanced outstanding pitching, hitting, defense, baserunning and character to overcome adversity.

“This was a unique and challenging season for everyone as we didn’t really get an opportunity to operate at full capacity,” Bernhard noted. “That said, a defining characteristic of these girls is their perseverance and character. When one girl was down, the others rallied together to pick each other up. Working through those challenges throughout the season culminated into the year-end push.”

PHOTO: The 12 members of the team represented eight different high schools in the western suburbs with strong softball programs. Team members included: Sam Martin, MacKenzie Bernhard, and Jade Mejia Wick, all from Downers Grove North; Rachel Davis and Sam Krupa from Downers Grove South; Emma Smith and Olivia Glass from Oak Park-River Forest; and Katherine Porter (Glenbard West), Madison Collins (York), Lilja Carden (Hinsdale Central), Alaina Grosvenor (Bolingbrook) and Emma Zenkel (Metea Valley).


Congratulations Nathan!

December 5th, 2013

"Congratulations Nate!"

Our patient Nate, who lives in Berwyn IL. and attends Nazareth Academy in LaGrange Park, was recently awarded his Eagle Scout! He received congratulation letters from Tim Tebow, Peyton Manning, Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady, and Dr. Johnson's personal favorite JORDY NELSON! Congratulations Nate. This is a huge accomplishment! We are so proud of you.

Tornado Relief for Washington IL.

November 21st, 2013

The Randall Park neighborhood of Downers Grove is hosting its own Tornado Relief Donation Drive on Friday, Nov. 22. They hope to fill two school buses with supplies for the tornado victims in Washington, IL.

Anyone interested in donating can drop items at 5305 Park Ave., from 1 pm to 6 pm. Donations can also be delivered to the School of Holistic Massage and Reflexology located at 515 Ogden Ave., Suite 300, in Downers Grove. Please call ahead to 630-968-7827 to arrange a drop-off.

Supplies may include:

  • pillows
  • soap
  • cleaning supplies
  • large trash bags
  • tools-rakes, shovels
  • batteries
  • non-electric light sources
  • work gloves
  • mops, towels and blankets
  • shampoo
  • water, sport drinks, baby formula
  • infant care items
  • non-perishable food/granola bars
  • manuel can openers
  • toilet paper
  • first aid kits
  • toothbrushes and toothpaste

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