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Welcome to Our Blog!

May 14th, 2020

Thank you for taking the time to visit our blog. Please check back often for weekly updates on fun and exciting events happening at our office, important and interesting information about orthodontics, and the latest news about our practice.

Feel free to leave a comment or question for our doctor and staff – we hope this will be a valuable resource for our patients, their families, and friends!

“Worst Halloween Candy” For Dental Health.

September 27th, 2017

Reader’s Digest states that chewy, sour, and hard candies are among the “worst Halloween candy” for teeth. In general, candy is harmful to teeth because as oral bacteria eat sugar, acid is created as a byproduct, says Dr. Matthew Messina, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. The acid can then dissolve tooth enamel. Chewy candies are “among the worst offenders” since they stick to teeth, and Dr. Messina notes that sour candies contain both sugar and acid. Reader’s Digest also includes hard candies on the list since they generally linger in the mouth longer. On the other hand, the article states that “chocolate tops the list of best bets,” noting Dr. Messina explains chocolate washes off teeth more easily than other candy options.

Visit MouthHealthy’s Kids’ Halloween Headquarters for additional information, including tips for a healthy Halloween and a Halloween Candy Survival Guide.

SELF Magazine Shares ADA’s Teething Tips.

June 22nd, 2017

SELF Magazine states that “dealing with a teething baby can be a serious challenge,” noting some symptoms of teething include trouble sleeping, irritability, and loss of appetite, according to the American Dental Association. To help ease teething pain, the article states that caregivers can “rub a teething baby’s gums with a clean finger, a small cool spoon, or a moist gauze pad, according to the ADA,” or offer the baby “a clean teething ring to chew on.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on teething.

ADA Spokesperson Identifies Strategies To Avoid Bad Breath.

June 19th, 2017

In a consumer-directed video on the Business Insiderwebsite, American Dental Association spokesperson Dr. Ada Cooper provides tips to avoid bad breath, which can be caused by several factors, including poor oral hygiene and dry mouth. Dr. Cooper reminds people to brush their teeth at night to remove food from the mouth. In addition, brushing the tongue and drinking plenty of water can help remove odor-causing bacteria, says Dr. Cooper. If these methods do not help, Dr. Cooper encourages people to visit their dentist to determine if something else may be causing bad breath.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on the causes of bad breath and solutions for it.

Brushing, Flossing Essential For Oral Health.

June 15th, 2017

discusses the importance of caring for gums as part of a good oral hygiene routine. The article shares advice from a dentist, who recommends using the proper flossing and brushing technique, avoiding tobacco products, managing stress, consuming a healthy diet, and visiting the dentist regularly.

MouthHealthy.org also provides resources for patients on flossing, including the correct flossing technique, and on brushing teeth, including the proper brushing technique.

4.0% of American Adults Carry High-Risk Oral HPV

May 8th, 2017

While tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the chief causes of oral cancer, the number of cases caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) have been increasing. In fact, the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 4.0% of all adults in the United States age 18 to 69 years have one or more of the 14 high-risk types of HPV known to cause oral cancer.

“This research is fueled by the rising incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), soon to be the most common HPV-related cancer in the United States, surpassing cervical cancer,” said Jo-Anne Jones, RDH, an educator and specialist in oral cancer. “We understand that a persistent infection with a high-risk strain is the pathway to oral and oropharyngeal cancer. This data substantiates the fear that HPV-related OPSCC is escalating quickly and reaching epidemic proportions.”

The CDC drew its conclusions from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2014, which included oral rinse samples. According to the data, 7.3% of all adults in this age range have one or more of the 37 types of oral HPV, which are sexually transmitted. Most sexually active adults acquire the virus at some point in their lives, and they typically pass it within 2 years without symptoms or complications.

The high-risk types of virus are cause for concern, though. By gender, 6.8% of men and 1.2% of women age 18 to 69 years carry high-risk HPV. Its prevalence was lower among non-Hispanic Asian adults overall (1.7%) and among men (2.3%) than non-Hispanic white (4.2%, 7.3% men), non-Hispanic black (4.3% all, 7.5% men), and Hispanic (3.4% all, 5.4% men) adults.

“Globally, we have seen a rise in oral and oropharyngeal cancer rates in recent years, much of which is due to an increase in HPV-related cancers. This trend is particularly alarming as many of these diagnoses are among younger, otherwise healthy nonsmokers who do not fall into the traditional risk group for oral cancers. Additionally, because the symptoms are often hard to identify, the cancers are not detected until they are late stage,” said Matthew H. J. Kim, founder, chairman, and CEO of Vigilant Biosciences.

“A recent survey we conducted found that there is still much work to be done around increasing awareness of oral cancer and the various risk factors for oral cancer. While the majority of US adults recognized tobacco use as a leading risk factor for oral cancer, many were not aware that HPV was also a risk factor. Clearly, more education and prevention is needed around this important topic to help reverse this trend and detect these cancers before it is too late,” Kim said.
- See more at: http://www.dentistrytoday.com

Natural Teeth Whitening: Fact vs. Fiction

April 12th, 2017

When it comes to teeth whitening, you may see many different methods featured online and in magazines—from oil pulling to charcoal, and even turmeric. It's no surprise that DIY whitening is top of mind, either. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth.

Healthy smiles come in many shades, though it's tempting to think ingredients in our own kitchens could hold the key to a brighter smile. Still, just because a method is natural doesn’t mean it’s healthy. In fact, DIY whitening can do more harm than good to your teeth. Here’s how:

Fruits

Fiction:
The approach maintains you can make your teeth whiter and brighter household staples that are naturally acidic (like lemons, oranges, apple cider vinegar), contain digestive enzymes (such as pineapple or mango) and something that is abrasive (like baking soda).

Fact:
When eaten as usual, fruit is a great choice. However, fruit and vinegar contain acid, and you put your pearly whites at risk when you prolong their contact with your teeth or use them to scrub your teeth because acid can wear away your enamel. Enamel is the thin outer coating of your teeth that protects you from tooth sensitivity and cavities.

Scrubs

Activated charcoal

Fiction:
These methods claim that scrubbing your teeth with ingredients like activated charcoal or a baking soda-hydrogen peroxide paste will bring a shine back to your smile.

Fact:
Using materials that are too abrasive on your teeth can actually make them look more yellow. Enamel is what you’re looking to whiten, but if you’re using a scrub that is too rough, you can actually wear it away. When that happens, the next layer of your tooth can become exposed – a softer, yellow tissue called dentin.

Instead, choose a whitening toothpaste with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. The Seal lets you know the toothpaste you choose is safe, effective and won’t damage your teeth.

Spices and Oils

Turmeric powder

Fiction:
Swishing oils like coconut oil in your mouth (oil pulling) or using spices like turmeric can help whiten your teeth.

Fact:
There is no reliable scientific evidence to show oil pulling or turmeric whitens teeth. Save the oil and spices for healthy meals instead.

Still Interested in Whitening?

Patient getting her teeth whitened at the dentist

The best natural ways to keep your teeth white are everyday healthy habits, including:

If you want to try a specific whitening product or service, just talk to your dentist before you begin. Whitening may not work on all teeth, and if you are a candidate, some methods—whether at-home or in the dental office—may be better for your teeth than others.

for more information please visit www.mouthhealthy.org

Pictures Show How Sugary Drinks Can Damage Teeth.

March 27th, 2017

The Daily Mail shares several images showing how sugary drinks may damage teeth. A dentist at the San Diego Dental Studio set up the experiment, which involved placing one tooth in “a bottle of a popular energy drink, another into cola, a third in diet cola and the fourth into water as the control.” The images show the teeth placed in the colas experienced staining after two weeks, while the enamel on the one placed in the energy drink was “literally crumbling.”

Meanwhile, the Sacramento carries an “Ask Mr. Dad” column, which responds to a reader’s question about whether caffeine is unhealthy for children. The response states that caffeine is “a problem for kids” for several reasons, including that caffeinated items, such as soda, are often acidic, which “can increase the risk of developing cavities.” In addition, “coffee drinks may also stain teeth.”

For additional information about the impact of sugary drinks on dental health, read the ADA Health Literacy in Dentistry Essay Contest winner’s article, “The Truth About Sugary Drinks and Your Smile.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on nutrition and dental health.

Old Toothbrushes Among Items To “Toss Immediately.”

February 8th, 2017

In a consumer-focused article, Realtor includes old toothbrushes among several bathroom items to “toss immediately” for “the sake of space, your health, and your sanity.” The article states that for those who have been using the same toothbrush for more than three or four months “that’s too long,” according to the American Dental Association. In addition, toothbrushes should be replaced sooner if bristles are “bent or frayed,” since they do not clean teeth as well. The article also encourages people to dispose of old makeup; expired sunscreen; hotel toiletries; almost empty shampoo bottles; unused beauty products and gifts; old razors; and expired medications, encouraging people to follow the FDA’s guidelines for safely disposing unused medication.

MouthHealthy.org and the Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provide additional information on toothbrush care for patients and for dental professionals. In addition, the ADA provides a list of toothbrushes with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Halitosis

January 9th, 2017

Bad breath happens. If you’ve ever gotten that not-so-fresh feeling on a date, at a job interview or just talking with friends, you’re not alone. Studies show that 50 percent of adults have had bad breath, or halitosis, at some point in their lives.

What Causes Bad Breath?
There are a number of reasons you might have dragon breath. While many causes are harmless, bad breath can sometimes be a sign of something more serious.

Bacteria
Bad breath can happen anytime thanks to the hundreds of types of bad breath-causing bacteria that naturally lives in your mouth. Your mouth also acts like a natural hothouse that allows these bacteria to grow. When you eat, bacteria feed on the food left in your mouth and leaves a foul-smelling waste product behind.

Dry Mouth
Feeling parched? Your mouth might not be making enough saliva. Saliva is important because it works around the clock to wash out your mouth. If you don’t have enough, your mouth isn’t being cleaned as much as it should be. Dry mouth can be caused by certain medications, salivary gland problems or by simply breathing through your mouth.

Gum Disease
Bad breath that just won’t go away or a constant bad taste in your mouth can be a warning sign of advanced gum disease, which is caused by a sticky, cavity-causing bacteria called plaque.

Food
Garlic, onions, coffee… The list of breath-offending foods is long, and what you eat affects the air you exhale.

Smoking and Tobacco
Smoking stains your teeth, gives you bad breath and puts you at risk for a host of health problems. Tobacco reduces your ability to taste foods and irritates gum tissues. Tobacco users are more likely to suffer from gum disease. Since smoking also affects your sense of smell, smokers may not be aware of how their breath smells.

Medical Conditions
Mouth infections can cause bad breath. However, if your dentist has ruled out other causes and you brush and floss every day, your bad breath could be the result of another problem, such as a sinus condition, gastric reflux, diabetes, liver or kidney disease. In this case, see your healthcare provider.

How Can I Keep Bad Breath Away?
Brush and Floss
Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss to get rid of all that bacteria that’s causing your bad breath.

Take Care of Your Tongue
Don’t forget about your tongue when you’re taking care of your teeth. If you stick out your tongue and look way back, you’ll see a white or brown coating. That’s where most of bad breath bacteria can be found. Use a toothbrush or a tongue scraper to clear them out.

Mouthwash
Over-the-counter mouthwashes can help kill bacteria or neutralize and temporarily mask bad breath. It’s only a temporary solution, however. The longer you wait to brush and floss away food in your mouth, the more likely your breath will offend.

Clean Your Dentures
If you wear removable dentures, take them out at night, and clean them thoroughly before using them again the next morning.

Keep That Saliva Flowing
To get more saliva moving in your mouth, try eating healthy foods that require a lot of chewing, like carrots or apples. You can also try chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on sugar-free candies. Your dentist may also recommend artificial saliva.

Quit Smoking
Giving up this dangerous habit is good for your body in many ways. Not only will you have better breath, you’ll have a better quality of life.

Visit Your Dentist Regularly
If you’re concerned about what’s causing your bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems such as gum disease or dry mouth and stop them before they become more serious. If your dentist determines your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care doctor.

Source; https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en

Candy Canes, Alcohol, Citrus Fruits Among Worst Holiday Foods For Teeth.

November 15th, 2016

 With the holiday season underway, many people may “put inhibitions aside,” and eat and drink “whatever looks good.” However, “the reckless consumption of cakes, candies, pies, beverages (alcoholic and otherwise), meats, and sides” come with “a number of potential health risks,” the article states, including some that are dental. The article provides a list of holiday foods and drinks that can damage teeth, including items such as bourbon and coffee, which can dry out the mouth; citrus fruits, which are acidic and can erode enamel; candy canes, which have a high sugar content and can also trigger a dental emergency, such as a broken or chipped tooth; and sticky candy and dried fruit, which can stay on the teeth longer than other types of candy and food.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional tips for cavity-free holidays and information on foods that can damage teeth.

Study Shows Taking Video Selfies May Help Improve Brushing Technique

November 10th, 2016

Lance Vernon, senior instructor at Case Western Reserve University, writes in the Conversation, that in the wake of studies questioning the value of flossing and regular dental x-rays, it may be time to “talk about something we can all agree on – toothbrushing.” A recent “very small study” in India looked at whether a video selfie may improve people’s brushing. The idea is that people may be “more self-conscious” about their toothbrushing while recording themselves, and so they may improve their technique. While the results are “complicated,” Vernon says it did show that people can take selfies of toothbrushing and others can use them to “analyze how well they brushed.”
for more information please visit www.mailview.bulletinhealthcare.com

Despite FDA Ban From Soaps, Triclosan Considered Effective Ingredient In Toothpaste.

November 9th, 2016

The New York Times reports that the ingredient triclosan, which the FDA banned from antibacterial soaps recently, can still be legally used in some toothpastes. According to FDA spokesperson Andrea Fischer, the ingredient is “demonstrated to be effective at reducing plaque and gingivitis.” Fischer adds, “Based on scientific evidence, the balance of benefit and risk is favorable for these products.” The article noted that a 2013 Cochrane review “concluded that toothpastes with triclosan and fluoride outperformed those with only fluoride.”

The ADA reported previously that a study in the May 2016 issue of mSphere was “designed to examine whether use of consumer products” containing triclosan could “alter gut microbiome composition, endocrine function, and markers for obesity, diabetes, and inflammation.” The ADA says the study is “strongly suggestive” of triclosan’s “safety for use by humans.”
The ADA provides official commentary on the FDA’s final rule and the Times reporting here.
for more information please visit www.ada.org

Dental Sealents are safe and affective in preventing tooth decay

November 2nd, 2016

The Sarasota (FL) Herald-Tribune  has picked up the article in the New York Times “The Upshot” blog reporting that a 2013 Cochrane review and a systematic review published in the August edition of The Journal of the American Dental Association both concluded that sealants are a valuable procedure that can protect children’s teeth because they are “effective in reducing cavities.” The article points out that the American Dental Association “encourages sealant application” and notes current evidence indicates BPA exposure from sealants is not harmful.

The systematic review of the use of sealants and the updated clinical practice guidelines are both available in the August issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association. The ADA News also reported previously on research published in the ADA Professional Product Review that shows BPA in dental sealants is safe.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on sealants.

12 tips for a healthy halloween!

October 19th, 2016

Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween but it’s important to have a plan,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty.

Here's how you can help your family stay MouthHealthy on Halloween and year-round.

Time It Right
Eat Halloween candy (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks
Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. ”Snacking on candy throughout the day is not ideal for your dental health or diet,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

Choose Candy Carefully
Avoid hard candy and other sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

Avoid Sticky Situations
Sticky candies cling to your teeth. The stickier candies, like taffy and gummy bears, take longer to get washed away by saliva, increasing the risk for tooth decay.

Have a Plan
It’s tempting to keep that candy around, but your teeth will thank you if you limit your stash. “Have your family pick their favorites and donate the rest,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says. “Look for organizations that help you donate candy to troops overseas, like Operation Gratitude, or see if your dentist has a candy take-back program.”

Drink More Water
Drinking fluoridated water can help prevent tooth decay. If you choose bottled water, look for kinds that are fluoridated.

Maintain a Healthy Diet
Your body is like a complex machine. The foods you choose as fuel and how often you "fill up" affect your general health and that of your teeth and gums.

Stay Away from Sugary Beverages
This includes soda, sports drinks and flavored waters. When teeth come in frequent contact with beverages that contain sugar, the risk of tooth decay is increased.

Chew Gum with the ADA Seal
Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after meals helps reduce tooth decay, because increased saliva flow helps wash out food and neutralize the acid produced by bacteria. “You might even want to think about giving sugarless gum out as a treat instead of candy,” says Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty. Find one with the ADA Seal.

Brush Twice a Day

Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste. Remember, replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won't do a good job of cleaning your teeth.

Clean Between Your Teeth

Floss your teeth once a day. Decay-causing bacteria get between teeth where toothbrush bristles can't reach. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.

Visit an ADA Dentist

Regular visits to your ADA-member dentist can help prevent problems from occurring and catch those that do occur early, when they are easy to "treat."

More from MouthHealthy
•Your Halloween candy survival guide
•Get pumpkin carving stencils, coloring sheets and more MouthHealthy Halloween activities for kids!
for more info visit www.mouthhealthy.org

YouTube Culture Spreading DIY Dentistry

September 26th, 2016

A piece in the American Student Dental Association’s September issue of ASDA News discusses do-it-yourself dentistry, a trend that is spreading through a number of YouTube videos highlighting the practice. For example, a video seen nearly 2.2 million times that is titled “Dentists Hate This Video!” shows a young woman using a do-it-yourself method for a cavity. Her video is “one of hundreds touting all kinds of homegrown cures for dental problems.” The article states lack of dental coverage and dental fear seem to motivate most of the “do-it-yourselfers.” Those two factors, “combined with internet access,” have resulted in “a do-it-yourself mentality of dental diagnosis and treatment that isn’t likely to end well.” In addition, “a growing number of people who take dental care into their own hands” are motivated by trust, the article states. “Building trust with patients is the most important thing you can do as a dentist,” says Dr. Kim Harms, ADA spokeswoman. “It’s your No. 1 clinical commodity. Unless patients can feel like they’re in control over their treatment plan, they won’t come to you.”

for more information please visit editiondigital.net

How Garlic Fights Tooth Decay

January 28th, 2016

 garlic oral health benefits Garlic has been used for medicinal purposes since 3000 B.C.

Allicin, the same stuff that gives you garlic breath, is responsible for garlic’s antifungal, antiviral, and antibacterial properties.

This same property in garlic can also help fight gum disease.

There are more than 500 different species of bacteria that naturally reside in your mouth. Some of these bacteria are beneficial to health and others aren’t. Keeping your mouth healthy is all about keeping the good and bad bacteria in balance. This, among other things, helps prevent gum disease.

Allicin prevents the bad bacteria that cause tooth decay from proliferating in the mouth. Several studies concluded that the use of garlic extract could help combat periodontitis (gum disease) by controlling the population of the bad bacteria and letting the good bacteria thrive.

Far too many oral health products claim to fight gum disease by killing “99.9% of bacteria” but this misguided. When you kill all bacteria, the regrowth rate of the good and the bad are different, such that you can create an imbalance between the good and bad bacteria, which can harm oral health and the health of the rest of the body.

This is why I’d love to see toothpaste with allicin added! No need to make the toothpaste garlic flavored, though…

How to reap the benefits?

You can either take garlic (allicin) as a supplement along with your vitamins.

Or, make garlic a regular part of your cooking. Garlic is highly nutritious, yet has very few calories. I like keeping crushed garlic in the freezer for a really easy, no-mess way to add garlic to my omelets in the morning. Dorot, which I get at Trader Joe’s, keeps crushed garlic in little frozen cubes in a tray.

Don’t eat garlic only for your oral health; garlic has also been shown to reduce the length of the common cold by 70%, from 5 days in a placebo group to just 1.5 days in the group given a garlic supplement. This is thought to be thanks to allicin’s ability to boost the body’s immune system.

For more information please visit their website HTTP://askthedentist.com/garlic-oral-health-benefits/

Propel Orthodontics

December 21st, 2015

Dr. Pamela Johnson Orthodontic Solutions is proud to introduce a new treatment option in our office. Propel Orthodontics is a new advance in orthodontic technology with the ability to straighten teeth in significantly less time.

Propel is a micro-invasive treatment that uses micro-osteoperforations to stimulate the bone to remodel faster therefore "Excellerate" your tooth movement."

Micro-osteoperforation with propel is:

Clinically proven safe and effective
Doctor-performed in a few minutes during your regularly scheduled office visit
Can be used with braces or clear aligners.

Micro-osteoperforation with propel offers straightforward solution to
your orthodontic needs in just a few steps.
1. Your doctor evaluates your orthodontic needs using an x-ray.
2. Before Propel, rinse twice with chlorhexidine, a disinfectant.
3. Your doctor anesthetizes the area and applies Propel where needed.
4. Your doctor discusses options for your next visit, and you can get back to your busy schedule!

Benefits of Micro-Osteoperforation with Propel
- See faster results without added discomfort
- Use Propel with any type of orthodontic appliance, whether braces or aligners.
- Receive Propel treatment during your regular office visit.
- Save time with fewer office visits.
- Forget surgery. Micro- Osteoperforation requires no recovery time.

Low-Carb diets can cause bad breath?

December 10th, 2015

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath.

Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic!

Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet.

"Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association.

Pass the Bread?
This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this."

The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates."

"It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodontist. Even so-called "sugar-free" products are often loaded with carbs.

"If you have a metabolic cause of bad breath, there is very little the dentist can do; you have to change your diet," he says.

In fact, "the South Beach diet permits more carbs than the traditional Atkins diet, so there is bound to be less bad breath on South Beach because you are not going into a state of ketosis," he says.

Perfect Bite, Pretty Face?

September 10th, 2015

The appearance of a person's bite affects how their attractiveness, personality and intelligence is rated by other adults, according to a study.

A study published in the November 2011 edition of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics asked 889 people to evaluate photos that had been manipulated to show either a normal bite or one of six imperfect bites, called occlusion or malocclusion in the dental world.

“The ratings of attractiveness, intelligence, conscientiousness, agreeableness and extraversion differed significantly depending on the occlusion status depicted,” the report said.

Those with an underbite were rated least attractive, intelligent and extraverted. Females with an imperfect bite were rated more favorably than males. Younger and more educated respondents were more critical in their evaluations than older, less educated respondents.

Drs. Jase A. Olsen, a private practitioner in Southern Pines, N.C., and Marita Rohr Inglehart, associate professor in the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry conducted the study.

"Judgments that are negatively influenced by the effects of malocclusion might leave those without a normal occlusion at a social disadvantage and professionally handicapped," the study notes.

The study also quotes earlier research showing that "attractive" people were perceived to be more intelligent and socially competent, to have a more positive personality, to have better social interactions and to receive more favorable professional ratings.

In addition, the study quotes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination III from 1988-91, which showed that 57 percent to 59 percent of adults had some degree of an imperfect bite.

Although that study is two decades old, it still provides the most current prevalence data for malocclusion among U.S. adults.

The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics is the official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists.

© 2015 American Dental Association. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission from the American Dental Association.

Sports and Energy Drinks and Your Smile

March 19th, 2015

While they may sound refreshing after a long jog or pick-up game of basketball, energy and sports drinks may do more harm than good. The high level of sugar and acid found in many of these drinks can cause damage to tooth enamel, thus elevating your risk for tooth decay.

Yes, there are health benefits to consuming orange juice, fruit juices, sports drinks, and flavored waters, which can contain valuable ingredients such as vitamin C, minerals, and other antioxidants. These drinks can also replenish nutrients lost during a sporting event and lower the chance of heart disease and cancer. That stated, if not consumed carefully, these beverages can harm your teeth. They are full of sugar, which converts to acid and wears away at your teeth, causing cavities, sensitivity, and eventually tooth loss.

Even one drink a day is potentially harmful, but if you are absolutely unable to give up that sports- or energy-drink habit, we encourage you to minimize your consumption, use a drinking straw or rinse with water after drinking. As odd as it may sound coming from us, do not brush immediately after drinking sports and energy drinks; softened enamel due to acid is easier to damage, even when brushing. Remember, it takes your mouth approximately 30 minutes to bring its pH level back to normal. The best thing to do is to wait an hour, then brush to remove sugar that lingers on your teeth and gums.

There are many sports drinks, energy drinks, and flavored waters out there today, so take the time to read the labels. Check for sugar content and citric acid in the ingredients. If you have any questions, or would like suggestions on the best sports drink options, please give us a call or ask us during your next visit!

February is National Children's Dental Health Month!

February 3rd, 2015

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month. Teach your kids the importance of good oral hygiene. Tooth decay is the number one chronic illness in children. In the past year 51 million school hours were lost due to dental problems. ...Research has shown that if a child’s tooth decay goes untreated, it can lead to tooth loss, speech problems and even loss of self- esteem.
Parents and caregivers can help encourage good oral health by:
* Encouraging a well-balanced diet that limits sugar and starchy foods. If these foods are included in the daily diet, eating them with a meal and not as a snack produces extra saliva to help rinse the food out of the mouth.
* Using fluoride toothpaste protects children’s teeth (for children less than seven years old, use only a pea-sized amount on their toothbrush).
* Asking a dentist or doctor about how to protect child's teeth with dental sealants and fluoridated drinking water.
* Brushing teeth twice daily. Parents may need to help younger children with this.
* Flossing teeth daily. You'll need to floss for your children until they are around four years old.
* Scheduling regular dental checkups every six months.

5 Remedies for Sensitive Teeth

January 20th, 2015

Tooth sensitivity is common in many of our patients, and can usually be identified by pain or discomfort when consuming foods or beverages that are hot, cold, sweet, or sour. Sensitivity can be felt when brushing or flossing, and can also be experienced after routine dental procedures such as the placement of a filling or crown, tooth restoration, or even teeth cleaning. Such sensitivity is usually temporary; if it does not cease after four to six weeks please consult us.
Tooth sensitivity is often due to the breakdown of tooth enamel or a receding gum line, which can occur from:

  • Teeth grinding
  • Tooth Decay
  • Gum disease
  • Vigorous brushing
  • Cracked or chipped teeth

In most instances, tooth sensitivity is treatable. Here are a few remedies you can take advantage of at home:

  1. Try a desensitizing toothpaste which contains chemicals that block sensations like hot and cold from reaching the nerves in your teeth.
  2. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush that will be gentler on both your teeth and gums.
  3. Maintain good oral hygiene by brushing twice every day and flossing once daily.
  4. Switch to a fluoride mouthwash.
  5. When possible, avoid acidic foods such as tea, tomatoes, and citrus fruits.

Depending on the cause and severity of your sensitivity, you may benefit from professional treatment. If you suffer from sensitive teeth, please be sure to contact us. We can set up an appointment to discuss your unique situation and determine the best way to address the problem.

Too old for braces? You Might be Surprised

January 13th, 2015

Although adolescence is a common time to get braces, there’s no reason for adults of any age to have to deal with crooked teeth, overbite, underbite, or other dental issues. In fact, the American Association of Orthodontists notes that demand for orthodontic treatment in adults continues to grow, with adults representing 20% of new patients.

You’re never too old for braces or other orthodontic appliances, but it’s important to consider the following:

  1. Braces don’t have to be as noticeable as the metal brackets of the past. Many adults opt for ceramic or plastic braces, which are bone-colored or clear, respectively. Another option is a lingual appliance, which attaches to the back side of your teeth. These so-called “invisible” braces are much less noticeable than traditional options.
  2. By adulthood, bone growth has stopped. This means that certain structural changes can only be achieved by surgery. Although this typically affects people with significant crowding, bite, or jaw problems, Drs. Neil Warshawsky and Ketti Boller can provide an individualized treatment plan that addresses your unique issues.
  3. Treatment may take a bit longer. The length of orthodontic treatment tends to be slightly longer for adults than adolescents. Exact estimates vary by individual, but the average length of time for adult braces wearers is two years, according to the Harvard Medical School.
  4. Outcomes are just as good for adults! Many adults worry that it’s too late to treat their orthodontic problems. However, treatment satisfaction tends to be very high, which is a testament to how effective braces can be in middle-aged and older adults.

It’s a Wrap: Ending the year with a smile!

December 31st, 2014

People have been ushering in the New Year for centuries but it became an official holiday in 1582 when Pope George XIII declared January 1st to be the day on which everyone would celebrate the New Year. At midnight people would yell, holler, and blow horns to scare away the evil spirits of the previous year so the New Year would be joyous and filled with opportunity. Nearly 500 years later, we still greet the New Year by whooping and hollering, but in a celebratory manner instead. Whether you intend to ring in the New Year quietly at home or have plans to join the countdown at a gala extravaganza, these tips can help you ring out the old and usher in the new with a smile.

Tips for a Happy New Year’s Eve Celebration from Dr. Pamela Johnson Orthodontic Solutions:

•Be Safe. There’s no way to predict the behavior of others on New Year’s Eve, but you can be responsible for your own behavior to keep yourself safe. If adult beverages will be part of your celebration, plan on spending the night wherever you are or line up a designated driver to bring you home after the party is over.

•Enjoy Family and Friends. Spending time with the important people in your life is what makes the holidays enjoyable. Coordinate your schedules and choose New Year’s Eve activities that everyone in the group will enjoy. You don’t have to go to a party to ring in the New Year; some people like to go bowling, see a movie, or have a great meal at home.

•Accessorize with a Smile. Whether you dress up or have a quiet dinner with family and friends, one of the best accessories you can add to your attire is a beautiful smile.

New Year’s Eve is a time to gather with friends and family, reflect on the year that’s coming to an end, and look forward to the new one with anticipation. Enjoy this transitional holiday in a way that’s safe, healthy, and fun. After all, counting down until the clock strikes 12 marks the beginning of a full year of opportunity ahead of you. From Dr. Pamela Johnson, have a great new year!

Giving thanks this holiday season

December 24th, 2014

With the hustle and bustle of the holiday season here, Dr. Pamela Johnson and our entire staff at Dr. Pamela Johnson Orthodontic Solutions wanted to stop for a moment and extend our best wishes to you, our patients, referring doctors and families, this holiday season.

As always, if you know anyone we can help, just let us know. We promise to give them the same quality orthodontic care that we have given you.

We hope that this holiday season brings fond memories. Thank you for being part of our family.

Happy Thanksgiving!

November 20th, 2014

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we would like to wish you a safe and happy Thanksgiving. Enjoy a day filled of friends, family, and great food.

We are very thankful for all of our patients and their families. We’d like to know, what are you most thankful for this year? Leave us a comment, or if you have any stories, photos or recipes to share with us, we encourage you to share them below or on our Facebook page!

We Offer Invisalign Teen!

October 21st, 2014

Dr. Pamela Johnson and our team are excited to offer Invisalign Teen, a clear alternative to braces that's just for teens! With Invisalign Teen, we are able to straighten your teen's teeth without the hassle, discomfort, and embarrassment of traditional braces.

Invisalign Teen's clear aligners are virtually invisible. What's more, they are removable, which means your child is free to eat anything they choose, as well as brush and floss with ease! And best of all, Invisalign Teen uses no wires or metal to straighten your teen's teeth.

Invisalign Teen aligners are made from a ligthweight plastic material and fit precisely on the teeth. Invisalign Teen has become a popular treatment here because it helps our younger patients achieve a straight, beautiful smile without their friends noticing.

Our team is aware that most teens today have a busy lifestyle, and sometimes, they tend to lose things, including their retainers or aligners. But with Invisalign Teen, if your child happens to lose an aligner, let our office know as soon as possible and we will have the aligner replaced.

For more information on Invisalign Teen, please give us a call at our Willowbrook office today!

Flag Day

June 10th, 2014

In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened on that day in 1777 by resolution of the Second Continental Congress. The United States Army also celebrates the Army Birthday on this date; Congress adopted "the American continental army" after reaching a consensus position in the Committee of the Whole on June 14, 1775.

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day; in August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress. Flag Day is not an official federal holiday. It is at the President's discretion to officially proclaim the observance. On June 14, 1937, Pennsylvania became the first (and only) U.S. state to celebrate Flag Day as a state holiday, beginning in the town of Rennerdale. New York Statutes designate the second Sunday in June as Flag Day, a state holiday.

Did you also know that the current American flag was a result of a school project? The resulting grade on the project was a B minus? In 1958, high school student Robert G. Heft of Lancaster, Ohio, was spurred on by his interest in politics and talk of Alaska and Hawaii becoming states to design a 50-star flag as a school project. His teacher, Stanley Pratt, gave him a B minus on the project, describing it as unoriginal. However, he would grant Heft a higher grade if Congress accepted the design. Thanks to the late congressman Walter Moeller, Heft earned his gold star when the design was accepted in 1960.

June is National Dairy Month!

June 3rd, 2014

In honor of June being Dairy Month, Dr. Johnson and her team at Dr. Pamela Johnson Orthodontic Solutions would like to remind our patients about the importance of dairy to your overall health! Regular consumption of dairy products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt, has been found to lower your chances of contracting gum disease (also known as periodontal disease).

Those who consume at least 55 grams of lactic acid a day are less at risk for gum disease. Eating dairy is not just healthy for building strong bones, but is essential for maintaining a strong, healthy mouth and a smile that will last a lifetime.

Questions about which foods you should steer clear of and which you should enjoy? Give us a call or ask us on Facebook by clicking on the link!

You're Never Too Old To Treat Yourself To a New Smile!

April 28th, 2014

Did you know one in every five orthodontic patients is an adult? We’re living longer and technology is improving, making orthodontic treatment an appealing and safe option for patients of all ages. As the trend toward treatment later in life grows, we’re seeing braces on parents as well as children – and even adult celebrities such as Tom Cruise, Gwen Stefani and Nicholas Cage have shown off their braces. It’s never too late to look and feel your best!

Can Braces Work for Adults?

People of all ages can benefit from orthodontic treatment. The physical process for moving teeth is the same, young or old, which means it’s never too late to address issues such as an overbite or underbite, crooked or crowded teeth, or jaw disorders.

How Do I Get Started?

If you’re considering orthodontic treatment, we’ll make a consultation appointment with you. During this meeting we will perform a general assessment of your oral health, discuss options for treatment, and answer any questions you may have. We will also discuss matters of cost and insurance. The next step is an orthodontic records appointment in which we take x-rays, photos, and an impression of your teeth. This information drives your unique treatment plan.

What Are the Benefits?

Straightening your teeth can improve your smile, your self-esteem, and your dental health. Technologically advanced new treatments make it easier to identify the option that best fits your lifestyle. Modern techniques and materials have made braces and aligners more effective, comfortable and unobtrusive than ever.

If you think you might benefit from orthodontic treatment, give our team a call so we may set up a consultation to determine what type of treatment best meets your needs!

Should I visit the dentist during my orthodontic treatment?

April 21st, 2014

So, you just got your braces on, and you’re wondering if you should continue visiting your general dentist since you’re seeing Dr. Pamela Johnson every other month. Patients always ask us if they should continue to see their dentist while in orthodontic treatment. In short, the answer is yes.

Today, we thought we would share a few reasons why it’s crucial to keep up with your regular visits with your dentist in addition to coming in for your regular adjustment appointment at Johnson Orthodontic Solutions.

One of the best reasons to visit your dentist while you undergo orthodontic treatment is to remove plaque and tartar. Having braces provides additional nooks and crannies in which food particles and bacteria can hide. Eventually, plaque and tartar can form around your brackets, bands or other appliances which can lead to cavities. Having your teeth professionally cleaned can help ensure most, if not all, plaque and tartar is removed. Even if you are undergoing clear aligner treatment, dental checkups and cleanings are equally as important.

The next reason to visit a dentist is to help protect your teeth from decalcification, or the loss of calcium in your teeth. A potentially serious condition in which white spots on your tooth surfaces, decalcification is irreversible and if left untreated, can lead to cavities. Decalcification is preventable; patients who cut down on sugary sweets and acidic foods, practice good oral hygiene, and visit their dentist regularly can help prevent decalcification.

The final reason we recommend visiting your dentist while you have braces is this: cavities can prolong your treatment. If you are interested in completing your orthodontic treatment on time and without any delays, visiting your dentist every six months or as recommended can go a long way toward making that a realistic goal. Your dentist can provide fluoride treatments or other treatments that strengthen your teeth and protect them from cavities.

Making sure to visit your dentist will help ensure your teeth look their best once your braces come off. If you do not have a general dentist and would like a recommendation on finding one in Willowbrook, Hinsdale, Darien, and Burr Ridge, please give us a call or let us know at your next adjustment appointment!

April is National Facial Protection Month

April 14th, 2014

The Importance of Facial Protection

Americans from all walks of life should mark April as National Facial Protection Month on their calendars. The American Association of Pediatric Dentistry, Academy for Sports Dentistry, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons have combined forces to sponsor this annual campaign, which aims to educate and remind us of the importance of protecting our face and teeth against impacts and injuries.

Wearing a helmet can save your life and prevent devastating physical damage in a variety of situations, from playing football to riding a bicycle. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, helmets reduce the risk of various head injuries by as much as 85 percent. Whether helmet laws apply in your area or not, Dr. Pamela Johnson and her team  want you to make sure you and your loved ones wear helmets with the appropriate safety ratings for specific activities. (A sticker on or inside the helmet will usually indicate this rating.) Helmets can also help save your teeth if they come with an attached faceguard, an essential addition for football players and others involved in contact sports.

Preventing Dental Injuries

A mouthguard can protect you against a variety of dental injuries, such as cracked, broken, or knocked-out teeth. The American Dental Association states that mouthguards play an essential role in preventing up to 200,000 dental injuries each year, and many states mandate their use for sports activities such as football and hockey. The Academy for Sports Dentistry warns, however, that these mouthguards must be custom-fitted as precisely as possible to prove effective. Have a professional-quality mouthguard  fitted by our team for better protection than a generic store-bought or “boil-and-bite” variety can offer. These cheaper versions tend to wear out quickly, interfere with proper breathing, and provide uneven degrees of cushion against impacts. Always have a fresh mouthguard fitted for each new sports season.

Choose the right combination of helmet, faceguard, and mouthguard to protect your teeth and face this April, and tell your friends to do the same! To learn more about mouthguards, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Pamela Johnson, please give us a call.

Congratulations Nathan!

December 5th, 2013

"Congratulations Nate!"

Our patient Nate, who lives in Berwyn IL. and attends Nazareth Academy in LaGrange Park, was recently awarded his Eagle Scout! He received congratulation letters from Tim Tebow, Peyton Manning, Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady, and Dr. Johnson's personal favorite JORDY NELSON! Congratulations Nate. This is a huge accomplishment! We are so proud of you.

Tornado Relief for Washington IL.

November 21st, 2013

The Randall Park neighborhood of Downers Grove is hosting its own Tornado Relief Donation Drive on Friday, Nov. 22. They hope to fill two school buses with supplies for the tornado victims in Washington, IL.

Anyone interested in donating can drop items at 5305 Park Ave., from 1 pm to 6 pm. Donations can also be delivered to the School of Holistic Massage and Reflexology located at 515 Ogden Ave., Suite 300, in Downers Grove. Please call ahead to 630-968-7827 to arrange a drop-off.

Supplies may include:

  • pillows
  • soap
  • cleaning supplies
  • large trash bags
  • tools-rakes, shovels
  • batteries
  • non-electric light sources
  • work gloves
  • mops, towels and blankets
  • shampoo
  • water, sport drinks, baby formula
  • infant care items
  • non-perishable food/granola bars
  • manuel can openers
  • toilet paper
  • first aid kits
  • toothbrushes and toothpaste

Welcome to Our Blog

October 10th, 2012

Thank you for taking the time to visit our blog. Please check back often for weekly updates on fun and exciting events happening at our office, important and interesting information about orthodontics and the dental industry, and the latest news about our practice. Feel free to leave a comment or question for our doctor and staff – we hope this will be a valuable resource for our patients, their families, and friends!

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