Burr Ridge Orthodontist

Fight the Fear of the Dental Office

November 4th, 2020

We know going into any dental office, whether it's the dentist or orthodontist, can cause some nervous butterflies. You could be scared that the treatment may hurt, you haven't been in for a while, or you're nervous to hear how your orthodontic treatment may go. Whatever your reason, Johnson Orthodontics will make sure your dental and emotional health are taken care of. Here are some strategies you can use at your next appointment to help ease any anxiety you may have:

1. Talk to Us

Sharing your thoughts and feelings makes a huge difference when you are anxious. If you have anxiety about your visit to Johnson Orthodontics, make sure to get your concerns off your chest by speaking with Dr. Johnson. Our team will be able to give you the best treatment if we know your needs.

  • Tell us about your anxiety. You can explain this to the receptionist when you make your appointment, and remind Dr. Johnson and the dental staff when you arrive.
  • Ask questions. We will answer all your questions and concerns, and sometimes knowing what's going to happen during your treatment could alleviate your fears.
  • Give us a signal. Talk to Dr. Johnson and the dental staff about creating a signal for when you are feeling overwhelmed and need a break during your appointment.
  • Feel any pain, tell us. Please don't feel embarrassed if you feel any pain or about your pain tolerance. Talk to our team so we make sure you feel comfortable.

2. Distract Yourself

Here are a few things you can do to try to take your mind off what's going on when the team is working on your teeth. You can do one or a combination of the strategies below.

  • Listen to music or an audiobook. Bring your headphones in and you can drown out the noise around you.
  • Keep your hands busy. Sometimes having something in your hands can help, so if you have a stress ball or even a fidget spinner, bring it in.
  • Daydream. Close your eyes and imagine being somewhere else that's relaxing to you.

3. Use Mindfulness Techniques

Another strategy is to try breathing techniques. This can also be combined with the suggestions for keeping your mind occupied.

  • Count your breaths. Inhale slowly and exhale for the same number of counts. Do this multiple times before you come in, in the lobby, or while you're in the dental chair.
  • Do a body scan. Relax your muscles by starting from your head and going through each body part until you get to your toes.

Dental visits of all kinds can seem scary, but we promise to be there for you every step of the way. We want to make your time getting your orthodontic treatments as easy and relaxing as possible. So try these strategies, and don't forget to let us know if you have any questions or concerns!

source: mouthhealthy.org

Why Mouth Guards are Essential

October 28th, 2020

With schools returning to in-person learning and sports coming back, it's important to know that wearing a mouth guard while playing sports is essential to protecting your children's teeth.

Most parents support the idea that mouth guards should be worn, but studies show a significant percentage of them do not wear their mouth guards while playing sports. In early 2017, the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) collected data in an independent survey* that delivered a clear message: 99 percent of parents whose children play organized sports felt youth should be required to wear mouth guards in order to play. Yet 37 percent of parents said their child never wears a mouth guard while playing sports. This includes games, practices and recreational play.

There is also a misconception that repairing a knocked out or broken tooth is not very expensive. According to the study, parents estimate it would cost $1,142 to replace a damaged permanent tooth, but in reality, costs to treat one knocked-out tooth over a lifetime can range from $5,000 to $20,000**. Parents and patients may not realize that restorations may have to be repeated periodically, which amplifies repair or replacements costs.

Which Sports Should Require Mouth Guards?

In a nutshell, all of them. The AAO's study shows that while a majority of parents think mouth guards should be required for football and hockey, only half the parents said the same thing for basketball and even less than that agreed for baseball. A 2007 study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association ranked basketball as the sport at the top of the list for the highest rate of dental injuries for both men’s and women’s intercollegiate athletes. And according to mouth guard manufacturer Shock Doctor, one in four injures on the basketball court occurs above the neck.

Wearing mouth guards should also be extended to sport practices. Forty percent of parents reported that their child’s sports practices are less structured than games, and generally have few or no medical personnel nearby.

Overall, when playing sports, whether it's an official game, practice, or a quick scrimmage in the park with friends, a mouth guard should be worn to protect the teeth from injury.

source: aaoinfo.org

*The American Association of Orthodontists commissioned Wakefield Research to conduct the 2017 AAO Sports Survey among 1,000 U.S. parents whose children play organized sports. The survey was conducted in January 2017 using an email invitation and an online survey. The overall sampling error rate for this survey is +/- 3.1 percent at the 95 percent level of confidence.

**Sports Health, “Common Dental Injury Management in Athletes,” vol. 7, no. 3, May-June 2015, p. 250.

 

Candy You Can Eat With Braces

October 22nd, 2020

Halloween is almost here! We know things may be different this year, but we're all going to indulge in some candy-goodness at the end of this month. If you're worried you can't have candy with braces, we have great news for you! Enjoying good candy with braces is still an option. However, there are certain candies that you want to avoid because they have a higher chance of damaging your braces and setting back your orthodontic treatment process.

Candies to avoid:
- Caramels
- Taffy
- Hard candy
- Chewy candy
- Jellybeans
- Licorice
- Bubble gum
- Suckers
- Sour candy
- Popcorn
- Nuts

Now you're probably thinking well what can I eat? Softer, melt-in-your-mouth candies are better and less risky when you have braces. So here are the candies you can enjoy in moderation.

Candies you can eat:
- Chocolate (without caramel or nuts)
- KitKats
- Reese's Peanut Butter Cups
- 3 Musketeers
- Marshmallows
- Cookies

Remember, any candy in excessive amounts can be harmful to your teeth and braces. The candy can accumulate around your braces and lead to white marks (decalcification), cavities or gum disease. Make sure to brush your teeth well after having your sugary snacks! Happy Halloween!

source: aaoinfo.org

How Soon Should My Child See an Orthodontist?

October 20th, 2020

As a parent, you want the best for your child and that includes healthy teeth and a pleasing smile. The American Dental Association recommends that a child visits a general dentist by their first birthday. Your dentist can alert you to any concerns about how the teeth and jaws are developing.

But when should you have your child see an Orthodontist?

Most orthodontic treatment begins between the ages of 9 and 14, but a check-up no later than age 7 gives your orthodontist the opportunity to recommend the appropriate treatment at the appropriate time. By age 7, your child has enough permanent teeth for an orthodontist to determine whether an orthodontic problem is occurring. If early treatment is in order, the orthodontist may be able to achieve results that may not be possible once the face and jaws have finished growing.

Not everyone needs orthodontic treatment, but seeing an orthodontist at age 7 would be beneficial and help your child receive treatment faster if they do. Well-aligned teeth look and feel good, and they contribute to good dental health and the ability to speak, chew, and bite.

Sleeping Face Up May Help With TMJ.

September 20th, 2016

Reader’s Digest (9/13, Laliberte) provides the “best sleep position for 11 health problems,” including temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The article recommends people with TMJ or another type of jaw pain sleep face up. “Don’t keep your face on its side, because that can put pressure on the joints or the jaw itself and make the pain worse,” says Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty, DDS, spokesperson for the American Dental Association.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on TMJ disorders for patients

What You Need to Know About the Safety of Dental Sealants

September 13th, 2016

The American Dental Association guidelines recommend dental sealants for all children and teens due to the tremendous effectiveness of sealants to prevent and arrest the progression of caries. The oral health community and the public have been concerned about the potential adverse effects associated with the release of BPA from resin-based dental sealants. Testing by the ADA Science Institute found:
1.BPA detected at trace levels on dental sealants
2.BPA exposure from dental sealants is 100 times lower than BPA present in the air
3.BPA levels in dental sealants tested were well below the daily exposure level set by the EPA

Read the full report in the new online edition of the ADA Professional Product Review and share this helpful infographic on the safety of dental sealants with your patients.

Patients With Gum Disease May Be More Likely To Suffer Heart Attack, Stroke, Severe Chest Pain, Study Indicates.

September 6th, 2016

Reuters (8/23, Crist) reports that “a study of more than 60,000 dental patients” indicated that “those with gum disease were twice as likely to have had a heart attack, stroke or severe chest pain.” Researchers found that “even after taking other risk factors for cardiovascular disease into account, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking,” individuals “with periodontal disease were still 59 percent more likely to have a history of heart problems.” The findings were published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Fox News: Charcoal Teeth Whitening Products Do Not Have ADA Seal Of Acceptance.

August 16th, 2016

Fox News (8/15) reports that dentists and other medical professionals are warning against using a DIY teeth whitening method that “involves smearing a charcoal-derived black mixture on teeth.” The method has become more popular since the posting of a YouTube video, that has been watched more than 1.5 million times. The article reports that dentists say using this DIY method “may lead to enamel deterioration and tooth erosion,” noting “the American Dental Association has currently not evaluated or approved any charcoal teeth whitening products.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on teeth whitening. In addition, several whitening toothpastes and a whitening product have the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Flossing Advised “If You Want To Keep Your Teeth.”

August 1st, 2016

In an articled titled, “Turns out, you really only need to floss if you want to keep your teeth,” the New York Daily News (7/25, Pesce) discusses flossing, noting the CDC’s recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found one-third of adults do not floss. “Do you need to floss? It depends on whether you want to keep your teeth or not,” said Dr. Matthew Messina, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Although many Millennials have benefited from fluoridated water and fluoride toothpaste, resulting in a lower decay rate, “our body chemistry does change as we get a older,” said Dr. Messina. “So some people might have a very high host-resistance (against bacteria) when they’re young, but they are going to find that is not the case as they get older.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on flossing, including how to properly floss teeth.

Workplace “Cake Culture” Contributing To Poor Oral Health, Obesity, UK Dentist Says.

July 19th, 2016

BBC News (UK) (6/24, Gallagher) reported that Professor Nigel Hunt from the Faculty of Dental Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons says the office “cake culture” is fueling dental and obesity problems. At the organization’s annual dinner for dentists, Prof. Hunt said, “For many people the workplace is now the primary site of their sugar intake and is contributing to the current obesity epidemic and poor oral health.”

The Daily Mail (6/24, Spencer) reported that Prof. Hunt is “particularly concerned that excessive consumption of sugary treats such as cakes, sweets and biscuits is contributing to tooth decay in adults,” encouraging employers to offer nuts, fruit, and cheese instead of sugary treats when celebrating special occasions or rewarding staff.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on how food affects dental health.

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