Clarendon Hills Orthodontist

Why Mouth Guards are Essential

October 28th, 2020

With schools returning to in-person learning and sports coming back, it's important to know that wearing a mouth guard while playing sports is essential to protecting your children's teeth.

Most parents support the idea that mouth guards should be worn, but studies show a significant percentage of them do not wear their mouth guards while playing sports. In early 2017, the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) collected data in an independent survey* that delivered a clear message: 99 percent of parents whose children play organized sports felt youth should be required to wear mouth guards in order to play. Yet 37 percent of parents said their child never wears a mouth guard while playing sports. This includes games, practices and recreational play.

There is also a misconception that repairing a knocked out or broken tooth is not very expensive. According to the study, parents estimate it would cost $1,142 to replace a damaged permanent tooth, but in reality, costs to treat one knocked-out tooth over a lifetime can range from $5,000 to $20,000**. Parents and patients may not realize that restorations may have to be repeated periodically, which amplifies repair or replacements costs.

Which Sports Should Require Mouth Guards?

In a nutshell, all of them. The AAO's study shows that while a majority of parents think mouth guards should be required for football and hockey, only half the parents said the same thing for basketball and even less than that agreed for baseball. A 2007 study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association ranked basketball as the sport at the top of the list for the highest rate of dental injuries for both men’s and women’s intercollegiate athletes. And according to mouth guard manufacturer Shock Doctor, one in four injures on the basketball court occurs above the neck.

Wearing mouth guards should also be extended to sport practices. Forty percent of parents reported that their child’s sports practices are less structured than games, and generally have few or no medical personnel nearby.

Overall, when playing sports, whether it's an official game, practice, or a quick scrimmage in the park with friends, a mouth guard should be worn to protect the teeth from injury.

source: aaoinfo.org

*The American Association of Orthodontists commissioned Wakefield Research to conduct the 2017 AAO Sports Survey among 1,000 U.S. parents whose children play organized sports. The survey was conducted in January 2017 using an email invitation and an online survey. The overall sampling error rate for this survey is +/- 3.1 percent at the 95 percent level of confidence.

**Sports Health, “Common Dental Injury Management in Athletes,” vol. 7, no. 3, May-June 2015, p. 250.

 

Candy You Can Eat With Braces

October 22nd, 2020

Halloween is almost here! We know things may be different this year, but we're all going to indulge in some candy-goodness at the end of this month. If you're worried you can't have candy with braces, we have great news for you! Enjoying good candy with braces is still an option. However, there are certain candies that you want to avoid because they have a higher chance of damaging your braces and setting back your orthodontic treatment process.

Candies to avoid:
- Caramels
- Taffy
- Hard candy
- Chewy candy
- Jellybeans
- Licorice
- Bubble gum
- Suckers
- Sour candy
- Popcorn
- Nuts

Now you're probably thinking well what can I eat? Softer, melt-in-your-mouth candies are better and less risky when you have braces. So here are the candies you can enjoy in moderation.

Candies you can eat:
- Chocolate (without caramel or nuts)
- KitKats
- Reese's Peanut Butter Cups
- 3 Musketeers
- Marshmallows
- Cookies

Remember, any candy in excessive amounts can be harmful to your teeth and braces. The candy can accumulate around your braces and lead to white marks (decalcification), cavities or gum disease. Make sure to brush your teeth well after having your sugary snacks! Happy Halloween!

source: aaoinfo.org

How Soon Should My Child See an Orthodontist?

October 20th, 2020

As a parent, you want the best for your child and that includes healthy teeth and a pleasing smile. The American Dental Association recommends that a child visits a general dentist by their first birthday. Your dentist can alert you to any concerns about how the teeth and jaws are developing.

But when should you have your child see an Orthodontist?

Most orthodontic treatment begins between the ages of 9 and 14, but a check-up no later than age 7 gives your orthodontist the opportunity to recommend the appropriate treatment at the appropriate time. By age 7, your child has enough permanent teeth for an orthodontist to determine whether an orthodontic problem is occurring. If early treatment is in order, the orthodontist may be able to achieve results that may not be possible once the face and jaws have finished growing.

Not everyone needs orthodontic treatment, but seeing an orthodontist at age 7 would be beneficial and help your child receive treatment faster if they do. Well-aligned teeth look and feel good, and they contribute to good dental health and the ability to speak, chew, and bite.

Archaeologists Discover Earliest Dental Prosthesis In Italy.

January 19th, 2017

International Business Times reported that “archaeologists have found the earliest dental prosthesis in Tuscany, in the collective tomb of an aristocratic family from the late Middle Ages.” The dental prosthesis, which may date back to the 14th century, is made of “five human teeth linked together by a golden band” to “replace the anterior arch of the jaw.”

The Daily Mail reported that the archaeologists said in their paper published in Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, “This dental prosthesis provides a unique finding of technologically advanced dentistry in this period.”

for more information please visit www.ibtimes.co.uk.com

Sleeping Face Up May Help With TMJ.

September 20th, 2016

Reader’s Digest (9/13, Laliberte) provides the “best sleep position for 11 health problems,” including temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The article recommends people with TMJ or another type of jaw pain sleep face up. “Don’t keep your face on its side, because that can put pressure on the joints or the jaw itself and make the pain worse,” says Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty, DDS, spokesperson for the American Dental Association.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on TMJ disorders for patients

What You Need to Know About the Safety of Dental Sealants

September 13th, 2016

The American Dental Association guidelines recommend dental sealants for all children and teens due to the tremendous effectiveness of sealants to prevent and arrest the progression of caries. The oral health community and the public have been concerned about the potential adverse effects associated with the release of BPA from resin-based dental sealants. Testing by the ADA Science Institute found:
1.BPA detected at trace levels on dental sealants
2.BPA exposure from dental sealants is 100 times lower than BPA present in the air
3.BPA levels in dental sealants tested were well below the daily exposure level set by the EPA

Read the full report in the new online edition of the ADA Professional Product Review and share this helpful infographic on the safety of dental sealants with your patients.

Patients With Gum Disease May Be More Likely To Suffer Heart Attack, Stroke, Severe Chest Pain, Study Indicates.

September 6th, 2016

Reuters (8/23, Crist) reports that “a study of more than 60,000 dental patients” indicated that “those with gum disease were twice as likely to have had a heart attack, stroke or severe chest pain.” Researchers found that “even after taking other risk factors for cardiovascular disease into account, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking,” individuals “with periodontal disease were still 59 percent more likely to have a history of heart problems.” The findings were published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

AHA Sets New Standard For Added Sugars In Children’s Diet.

September 1st, 2016

The Hill (8/22, Wheeler) reports that the American Heart Association has announced a new standard for how much sugar children should consume a day. The group is “recommending only 6 teaspoons – the equivalent of about 100 calories or 25 grams – for children ages 2 to 18.” It also recommended children under 2 not consume any added sugars. The recommendations were published in the AHA journal Circulation.

AFP (8/22) notes that the AHA’s report found that American children on average eat three times more sugar than its daily recommended intake. The report said, “Eating foods high in added sugars throughout childhood is linked to the development of risk factors for heart disease, such as an increased risk of obesity and elevated blood pressure in children and young adults.”
For more information visit: MorningHuddle.com

Brushing Teeth, Flossing Among Recommended Daily Habits.

August 29th, 2016

Business Insider (8/21, Gillett) includes brushing teeth and flossing among “17 quick and easy daily habits” that readers recommend to become a healthier person. The article notes that the ADA recommends brushing twice a day and flossing daily. Not following this guidance could increase the risk for developing other health issues, the article adds.

In an article in the Free Press (ME) (8/18), the Maine Dental Association noted that “the American Dental Association recommends brushing for two minutes twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, cleaning between teeth once a day with floss or another interdental cleaner, and visiting a dentist regularly.”

In the Harvard University (MA) (8/17) “Harvard Health Blog,” Robert Shmerling, MD, an associate professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, discusses recent news questioning the benefits of dental flossing, citing a lack of research. Dr. Shmerling states, “These headlines...miss the mark on this flossing kerfuffle,” and he adds that “unproven is unproven, not disproven.” The “obvious next step,” says Dr. Shmerling, is for researchers to have “a well-funded, well-designed study” to examine the health impact of flossing. In the meantime, “I’m not going to wait for the research; I’m going to keep flossing,” he states.

The ADA has released a statement on the benefits of using interdental cleaners, and a Science in the News article titled “The Medical Benefit of Daily Flossing Called Into Question” discusses evidence about the impact of flossing on oral health.

MouthHealthy.org also provides resources for patients on flossing, including the correct flossing technique.

Mouthguards Help Protect Children From Dental Emergencies.

August 22nd, 2016

The Danville (CA) Patch (8/14) stated that “a mouthguard is an essential piece of athletic gear,” recommending children wear mouthguards while “participating in sports and recreational activities” to help minimize the risk of dental damage and facial injuries. The article noted that three types of mouthguards exist: custom-made, ready-made, and boil and bite.

MouthHealthy.org and the Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provide additional information on mouthguards for patients and for dental professionals.

Fox News: Charcoal Teeth Whitening Products Do Not Have ADA Seal Of Acceptance.

August 16th, 2016

Fox News (8/15) reports that dentists and other medical professionals are warning against using a DIY teeth whitening method that “involves smearing a charcoal-derived black mixture on teeth.” The method has become more popular since the posting of a YouTube video, that has been watched more than 1.5 million times. The article reports that dentists say using this DIY method “may lead to enamel deterioration and tooth erosion,” noting “the American Dental Association has currently not evaluated or approved any charcoal teeth whitening products.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on teeth whitening. In addition, several whitening toothpastes and a whitening product have the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Dental Sealants Safe And Effective In Preventing Tooth Decay.

August 8th, 2016

The ADA News (8/1, Manchir) reports that “a 6-year-old child is exposed to more BPA” from food, drinks, and cosmetic products “than from the amount that is in dental sealants,” according to research published in the August issue of the ADA Professional Product Review. The article reports that “the ADA Science Institute staff tested the BPA release from 12 dental sealants used by dentists in the U.S.,” finding the BPA released from dental sealants is .09 nanograms, “well below” the EPA’s “limit proposed for a 6-year-old child.” Dr. David Sarrett, PPR editor, said, “This issue of the PPR provides a much-needed perspective on the amount of BPA in dental materials compared with other sources of exposure.”

In addition, a release on PRNewswire (8/1), states in continuing coverage that “a new systematic review and updated clinical practice guideline from the American Dental Association (ADA) and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) show dental sealants are a powerful and effective therapy in the fight against childhood dental decay and disease.” The systematic review and the updated clinical practice guidelines are both available in the August issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association and the July/August issue of AAPD’s Pediatric Dentistry Journal. Lead author Dr. Timothy Wright said, “The joint report reaffirms that sealants should be a routine part of cavity prevention, as children with sealants are up to 80 percent less prone to cavities compared to those without them.”
For more information visit www.ADA.com

Increasing Number Of Adults Turning To Braces.

August 4th, 2016

US News & World Report (7/27, Esposito) reports that adults are increasingly “getting braces to straighten their teeth, fix their bites and improve their smiles.” The article reports that “adults made up a record high of nearly 1.5 million orthodontics patients in the U.S. and Canada,” according to a 2014 survey from the American Association of Orthodontists. According to the article, “This rising popularity” is due in part to “orthodontic options that make braces inconspicuous.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on braces.

JADA Article Discusses Antibiotic Use In Dentistry.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (7/25) reported that the CDC and the Organization for Safety, Asepsis, and Prevention (OSAP) collaborated to publish an article in The Journal of the American Dental Association August issue, concerning responsible antibiotic use in dentistry. According to the article, “In an effort to improve antibiotic use in dentistry, best practices were developed to guide dentists through the entire antibiotic prescribing process.”

The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provides additional information on antibiotic stewardship for dental professionals.

Flossing Advised “If You Want To Keep Your Teeth.”

August 1st, 2016

In an articled titled, “Turns out, you really only need to floss if you want to keep your teeth,” the New York Daily News (7/25, Pesce) discusses flossing, noting the CDC’s recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found one-third of adults do not floss. “Do you need to floss? It depends on whether you want to keep your teeth or not,” said Dr. Matthew Messina, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Although many Millennials have benefited from fluoridated water and fluoride toothpaste, resulting in a lower decay rate, “our body chemistry does change as we get a older,” said Dr. Messina. “So some people might have a very high host-resistance (against bacteria) when they’re young, but they are going to find that is not the case as they get older.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on flossing, including how to properly floss teeth.

Reader’s Digest: People May Make Eight Common Mistakes Brushing Teeth.

July 25th, 2016

Stating that it’s easier than one might think “to make tooth brushing mistakes,” Reader’s Digest (4/13, Bender) identified eight common mistakes people may make while brushing. For example, a common mistake is not brushing teeth long enough, the article stated, noting that “the American Dental Association recommends brushing for two minutes, but many people fall woefully short—and don’t even realize it.” According to the article, common mistakes also include brushing too hard, using an incorrect angle while brushing, using a toothbrush with bristles that are too firm, using a toothbrush head that is too large, using the same toothbrush for too long, not flossing regularly, and not brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. “Dental disease is totally preventable,” says ADA spokesperson Dr. Sally Cram, “and a lot of it can be avoided by stepping up your home brushing program and having check-ups.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on the proper brushing technique.

USA Today Covers Study Finding Nail Biting And Thumb Sucking May Reduce Risk Of Developing Allergies.

July 21st, 2016

USA Today (7/19, May) discusses a new study, which CBS News first reported on last week, that finds children who suck their thumbs or bite their nails are less likely to develop certain allergies. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, “observed more than 1,000 participants from childhood to adulthood,” finding that “at age 13, 38% of children who frequently sucked their thumb or bit their nails had an allergy, compared to 49% of those who didn’t.” The results were similar for these individuals at age 32. Despite the findings, the authors said, “We do not suggest that children should be encouraged to take up these oral habits.”

Harvard University (MA) (7/19, McCarthy) added that continued thumb sucking after permanent teeth come in may cause problems with proper alignment of teeth. The article notes the American Dental Association offers tips to help children stop sucking their thumbs, recommending, for example, parents praise children when they are not sucking their thumbs.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on nail biting and thumb sucking for patients.

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