Dr. Pamela Johnson Orthodontist

National Facial Protection Month

April 28th, 2021

April might almost be over, but Spring sports are just beginning!

Remember to wear a mouth guard when you're at practice or any games. If you don't have one, Dr. Johnson can get you suited up! Call our office at 630-887-1188 to help protect your smile.

 

Teeth Grinding

April 15th, 2021

Teeth, Mouth, Dental, Dentist, Tooth, Lips, Oral, Gum

Teeth grinding can be caused not just by stress and anxiety but by sleep disorders, an abnormal bite or teeth that are missing or crooked. A study in the November 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that teeth grinding is also associated with alcohol and tobacco use. People who drink alcohol and smokers are approximately twice as likely to grind their teeth.

In a September 2020 report, the ADA Health Policy Institute found that more than half of dentists surveyed saw an increase of patients with dental conditions often associated with stress: Teeth grinding and clenching, chipped and cracked teeth, and symptoms of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder such as jaw pain and headaches.

The symptoms of teeth grinding include:

  • dull headaches
  • jaw soreness
  • teeth that are painful or loose
  • fractured teeth

Dr. Johnson or your general dentist can fit you with a mouth guard to protect your teeth during sleep. In some cases, your dentist or physician may recommend taking a muscle relaxant before bedtime. If stress is the cause you need to find a way to relax. Meditation, counseling and exercise can all help reduce stress and anxiety.

Teeth grinding is also common in children. However, because their teeth and jaws change and grow so quickly it is not usually a damaging habit that requires treatment and most outgrow it by adolescence.

Although in adults teeth grinding is often the result of stress, the same is not always true with children. Other possible causes of teeth grinding in children include:

  • irritation in the mouth
  • allergies
  • misaligned teeth

If you’re concerned about your child’s teeth grinding, ask your child’s dentist or Dr. Johnson about the potential causes and, if necessary, the possible solutions.

source: mouthhealthy.org

Sparkling Water - Is It Good For My Teeth?

April 5th, 2021

glass of sparkling water

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation—including sparkling water—has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).

So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?

According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth—and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth.

Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water—and Protecting Your Teeth

  • Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too—it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities).
  • Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
  • Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember—sparkling or not—plain water is always the best choice.

source: mouthhealhy.org

Can I Use My HSA or FSA for Orthodontic Treatment?

March 22nd, 2021

What is an HSA or FSA account?

Health Savings Accounts (HSA) and Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA), often offered by your employer, allow you to set aside money for qualifying health care expenses for yourself, your spouse and eligible dependents.

Can I use my HSA or FSA for orthodontic treatment? 

In most cases, yes, you can use your HSA or FSA for eligible orthodontic treatment. Only the portion of your orthodontic payments(s) not paid by your dental insurance or any other plan may be considered an eligible expense.

How can my HSA or FSA help save me money?

HSA and FSAs are types of savings account that let you set aside money on a pre-tax basis to pay for qualified medical expenses. By using untaxed dollars in an HSA or FSA to pay for your orthodontic treatment, you save money.

Contact your HSA or FSA provider for specific details.

Water Flossing: What is it and should I do it?

March 18th, 2021

Woman using ADA-accepted Waterpik water flosser

Water flossing is a way to clean between and around your teeth. A water flosser is a handheld device that sprays streams of water in steady pulses. The water, like traditional floss, removes food from between teeth.

Water flossers that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance have been tested to be safe and effective at removing plaque, which puts you at a higher risk for cavities and gum disease. Water flossers with the ADA Seal can also help reduce gingivitis, the early form of gum disease, throughout your mouth and between your teeth.

Water flossers can be an option for people who have trouble flossing by hand. People who have had dental work that makes flossing difficult—like braces, or permanent or fixed bridges—also might try water flossers.

Cleaning between your teeth once a day is an important part of your dental hygiene routine. You should also brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and see your dentist regularly.

source: mouthhealthy.org

Why are Mouth Guards Important?

March 11th, 2021

Mouthguard

Imagine what it would be like if you suddenly lost one or two of your front teeth. Smiling, talking, eating—everything would suddenly be affected. Knowing how to prevent injuries to your mouth and face is especially important if you participate in organized sports or other recreational activities.

Mouth guards, also called mouth protectors, help cushion a blow to the face, minimizing the risk of broken teeth and injuries to your lips, tongue, face or jaw. They typically cover the upper teeth and are a great way to protect the soft tissues of your tongue, lips and cheek lining.

When Should You Wear a Mouth guard?

When it comes to protecting your mouth, a mouth guard is an essential piece of athletic gear that should be part of your standard equipment from an early age.

While collision and contact sports, such as boxing, are higher-risk sports for the mouth, any athlete may experience a dental injury in non-contact activities too, such as gymnastics and skating.

source: mouthhealthy.org

The Benefits of Clear Braces

January 27th, 2021

Have you considered straightening your smile lately?

Many adults are turning to orthodontics because they didn’t have an opportunity to correct their smiles as a child or, over the years, their teeth have drifted back out of alignment. The problem is, what adult wants to spend a year or more wearing metal braces? The awkward teenage years were bad enough the first time!

Nevertheless, orthodontic technology continues to improve, and we are able to offer a option for our patients using Invisalign

Invisalign, a clear braces system that relies on transparent aligners instead of metal brackets and wires, can help straighten your smile without the hassles that most people associate with braces.

For instance:

  • With Invisalign, you take out your aligners while you eat, which means you don’t have to worry about food restrictions or miss out on your favorite crunchy or chewy treats.
  • You also remove the aligners to brush and floss your teeth, so there’s no need to brush around brackets or attempt to thread floss through wires.
  • You’ll be provided with a series of aligners at a time, so you don’t have to keep coming back to the office for “tightening” – you just switch to the next aligner in the series.
  • As long as you wear your aligners for the recommended 22 hours per day, you can remove your clear braces for a special event if you like (although the aligners are virtually invisible, so there’s very little need).

Invisalign can be used to treat mild to moderate misalignments and correct crowded, widely spaced, overlapping, and twisted teeth. We are more than happy to assess your smile and see if Invisalign will work for you!

Benefits of Early Orthodontic Care

January 21st, 2021

You may have seen our previous posts about how it is highly recommended that children see an orthodontist by the time they are 7 years old. There are a couple reasons for this. An orthodontist, like Dr. Johnson, can periodically observe the growth and eruption of permanent teeth to make sure everything is coming in properly. And if teeth are erupting in positions that would cause issues in the future, early treatments can be done.

Here are a few options that orthodontists can do during the early years:

Palatal expander - In younger patients, palatal expansion may reduce the need for extractions or prevent impacted teeth. It helps make the upper jaw wider to help reduce crowding in abnormally narrow arches. Cases not corrected in growing patients could lead to surgery, bite problems, or more costly treatments down the road.

Early interceptive treatment - Sometimes a short time in braces can correct problems early and prevent larger problems later. An example of interceptive treatment is correcting an anterior crossbite.

Tooth removal - Sometimes removing baby or impacted teeth can help permanent teeth grow in better and encourage them to come in closer to their ideal position without orthodontic appliances. Dr. Johnson will suggest the best time for extractions, if they are necessary, to take advantage of your child's growth and development.

Remember, early visits are highly recommended but not all early visits result in orthodontic treatment. One of three things could result from your child's first visit:

  1. There may be no need for treatment at the time.
  2. Treatment may be needed in the future, so periodic appointments for observation would be recommended.
  3. A problem already exists that would benefit early treatment and will be discussed during the consultation.

Source: aaoinfo.org

Tips To Avoid Tooth Discoloration.

October 16th, 2017

 QK lists several tips to whiten teeth and avoid tooth discoloration. For example, GQ suggests people brush, floss, and visit the dentist regularly; consider using an electric toothbrush; avoid major staining culprits, such as coffee, red wine, and tea; consume calcium-rich foods to help strengthen enamel and slightly abrasive foods, such carrots and nuts, to rub off stains; avoid tobacco products; use a whitening toothpaste; apply whitening strips; and consider whitening at the dentist office. GQ also emphasizes the importance of consulting with a dentist prior to whitening teeth.

Dental professionals can direct their patients to MouthHealthy.org, ADA’s consumer website, for evidence-based information about teeth whitening. The ADA provides a complete list of toothpastes with the ADA Seal of Acceptance, including some with stain removal attributes. In addition, Crest 3D White Whitestrips Glamorous White and the Oral-B Oscillating-Rotating-Pulsating (O/R/P) Electric Rechargeable Toothbrush have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

For more additional information please visit bulletin healthcare.com

Bruxism Among Signs Of Stress Not To Ignore.

October 11th, 2017

PopSugar states that “it’s important to deal with and resolve the causes of stress, because when left unchecked,” it may affect physical, mental, and emotional health. The article states that “stress can manifest itself in telltale ways,” identifying several “physical signs” not to ignore since they may suggest “mental and emotional health” is “buckling under the strain.” One sign of stress is bruxism, which may cause jaw pain, tooth damage, and headaches. According to the article, additional signs of stress may include lack of energy, getting sick easily, and changed eating habits.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on bruxism.

Oral Health Issues May Indicate Other Health Conditions.

October 2nd, 2017

Reader’s Digest discusses what oral health issues could reveal about overall health, stating, for example, that signs of gum disease include red, swollen, and bleeding gums, which may also be a sign of diabetes. “If gums bleed a lot and are swollen or the patient is having frequent abscesses or infections, the dentist might start to question if you have a family history of diabetes,” says ADA spokesperson Dr. Sally Cram. Reader’s Digest adds that chronic bad breath may be a sign of gastroesophageal reflux disease, which may also damage teeth, and although several factors can contribute to dry mouth, the condition may also be a sign of the autoimmune disease Sjögren’s syndrome.

The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org and MouthHealthy.org provide information on diabetes for dental professionals and patients. In addition, the ADA offers the online course: Diabetes and the Dental Professional. The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org and MouthHealthy.org also provide information on xerostomia for dental professionals and for patients. In addition, MouthHealthy.org provides information for patients on gum disease and bad breath.

“Worst Halloween Candy” For Dental Health.

September 27th, 2017

Reader’s Digest states that chewy, sour, and hard candies are among the “worst Halloween candy” for teeth. In general, candy is harmful to teeth because as oral bacteria eat sugar, acid is created as a byproduct, says Dr. Matthew Messina, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. The acid can then dissolve tooth enamel. Chewy candies are “among the worst offenders” since they stick to teeth, and Dr. Messina notes that sour candies contain both sugar and acid. Reader’s Digest also includes hard candies on the list since they generally linger in the mouth longer. On the other hand, the article states that “chocolate tops the list of best bets,” noting Dr. Messina explains chocolate washes off teeth more easily than other candy options.

Visit MouthHealthy’s Kids’ Halloween Headquarters for additional information, including tips for a healthy Halloween and a Halloween Candy Survival Guide.

Green Tea Extract Fights Tooth Sensitivity and Cavities

September 18th, 2017

Current approaches to treating tooth sensitivity don’t last very long. Now, a team of Chinese researchers has developed a material based on an extract from green tea that provides longer relief and may help prevent cavities as well.

Sensitivity occurs when teeth are worn down to the dentin and to the hollow microscopic tubes found there. When hot and cold liquids and food contact the underlying nerve endings in the teeth via these exposed tubes, pain follows. Unprotected dentin also is vulnerable to cavity formation.

Typically, these tubes are plugged with nanohydroxyapatite, which doesn’t stand up well to regular brushing, grinding, erosion, or acid produced by bacteria. The researchers, though, encapsuled nanohydroxyapatite and a green tea polyphenol known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in silica nanoparticles, which can stand up to acid and wear and tear.

Testing on extracted wisdom teeth showed that the material plugged the dentin tubules, released EGCG for at least 96 hours, stood up to tooth erosion and brushing, and prevented the growth of Streptococcus mutans and biofilm formation. It also showed low toxicity.

Based on these findings, the researchers say the material could be a good candidate for combating tooth sensitivity and cavities. The study, “Development of Epigallocatechin-3-gallate-Encapsulated Nanohydroxyapatite/Mesoporous Silica for Therapeutic Management of Dentin Surface,” was published by Applied Materials & Interfaces.
For more information please visit
www.dentistrytoday.com

Drinking Fluoridated Tap Water Encouraged.

September 7th, 2017

The Daily Mail reported that it tested the pH levels of “popular brands of bottled waters,” finding some had a pH level of four. The article stated that beverages with “pH levels closer to zero are more acidic” and may erode dental enamel. The article reported that bottled water may also contain “insufficient amounts of fluoride.” Given this, a dentist quoted in the article discussed the benefits of drinking fluoridated tap water. The article also noted that the American Dental Association encourages drinking fluoridated water to help prevent dental caries.

Business Insider (8/11, Schmalbruch) reported that adding flavor to water, especially citric flavors, can lower the pH level, making it “more acidic.”

Additional information about fluoride and community water fluoridation is available at ADA.org/fluoride. The ADA Catalog also features the Fluoride Nature’s Cavity Fighter brochure. The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provides additional information on dental erosion for dental professionals.

Limit Sugar Consumption To Help Reduce Cavity Risk.

August 24th, 2017

Stating “it should go without saying that tooth brushing is a prerequisite for a healthy set of chompers,” Reader’s Digest adds that another way to help prevent cavities is to “avoid eating sugar and other simple carbohydrates.” The article explains that bacteria in the mouth “thrive off of the sugars” left on teeth, releasing acids that can harm dental enamel and lead to cavities. The article also points to information on brushing and flossing at MouthHealthy.org.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on nutrition and dental health and tips to reduce sugary snacking.

Redbook Discusses Toothpaste, Flossing, Dental Emergencies.

July 31st, 2017

Redbook provides oral health tips, emphasizing the importance of brushing teeth with a fluoride toothpaste and flossing. The article also discusses dental emergencies, recommending people seek care from a dentist immediately if they break a tooth.

The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org and MouthHealthy.org provide additional information on brushing teeth for dental professionals and patients. The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org and MouthHealthy.org also provide additional information on interdental cleaners, including floss, for dental professionals and patients. MouthHealthy.org provides information for patients on dental emergencies, including dental trauma. The ADA also lists an emergency tooth preservation product with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Mayo Clinic Discusses Teething, Caring For Baby Teeth.

July 5th, 2017

In an article on infant development from seven to nine months, Mayo Clinic discusses teething, stating symptoms may include “drooling more than usual and chewing on just about anything.” To help ease teething pain, the article states caregivers can rub the baby’s gums with a finger or offer a teething ring. The article recommends brushing teeth as soon as they erupt, and using “a smear of fluoride toothpaste no bigger than the size of a grain of rice” for children younger than three years old.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on teething and baby teeth.

SELF Magazine Shares ADA’s Teething Tips.

June 22nd, 2017

SELF Magazine states that “dealing with a teething baby can be a serious challenge,” noting some symptoms of teething include trouble sleeping, irritability, and loss of appetite, according to the American Dental Association. To help ease teething pain, the article states that caregivers can “rub a teething baby’s gums with a clean finger, a small cool spoon, or a moist gauze pad, according to the ADA,” or offer the baby “a clean teething ring to chew on.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on teething.

ADA Spokesperson Identifies Strategies To Avoid Bad Breath.

June 19th, 2017

In a consumer-directed video on the Business Insiderwebsite, American Dental Association spokesperson Dr. Ada Cooper provides tips to avoid bad breath, which can be caused by several factors, including poor oral hygiene and dry mouth. Dr. Cooper reminds people to brush their teeth at night to remove food from the mouth. In addition, brushing the tongue and drinking plenty of water can help remove odor-causing bacteria, says Dr. Cooper. If these methods do not help, Dr. Cooper encourages people to visit their dentist to determine if something else may be causing bad breath.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on the causes of bad breath and solutions for it.

Oral Cancer Screenings Can Save Lives.

May 22nd, 2017

The University of Southern California states that according to the Oral Cancer Foundation, “nearly 50,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral cancer this year,” and “only about half will be alive five years after diagnosis.” Oral cancer patients have an 80 to 90 percent survival rate when the cancer is found in the early stages. However, most patients are diagnosed in the later stages, according to the foundation. With this in mind, the article stresses the importance of oral cancer screenings for early detection.

The ADA News reported previously that April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, “an apt time for dental professionals to review information about oral cavity and oropharynx cancers.”

Oral Health Topics on ADA.org offers information on oral and oropharyngeal cancers for dental professionals, including statistics and a protocol for oral cancer examinations. The ADA’s consumer website, MouthHealthy.org, also provides information for patients about oral cancer.

Tooth Banking Trend “Gaining Acceptance.”

May 17th, 2017

CNN discusses the trend of cryopreserving children’s baby or wisdom teeth for stem cells, stating the practice is “gaining acceptance” as research suggests the dental stem cells could be used in “potentially life-saving” treatments. However, scientists are divided on the benefits of the practice at this time. Dr. Pamela Robey, chief of the craniofacial and skeletal diseases branch of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, calls the studies “promising,” but adds that they “have really not been that rigorous.” Dr. Jade Miller, president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, said that much of the research is “really at its infancy,” but “there’s a very strong chance there’s going to be utilization for these stem cells, and they could be life-saving.”

The ADA lists an emergency tooth preservation product with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
for more information please visit www.mouthhealthy.org

New York Times: Many Prescription Medications Cause Xerostomia.

May 1st, 2017

The New York Times states that “a frequent side effect of many commonly prescribed drugs” is xerostomia, according to a 2015 review of research on treating xerostomia published in the journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management. The New York Times states many “common culprits in xerostomia,” include benzodiazepine, antidepressants, some oral drugs used to reduce blood sugar, respiratory agents, quinine, some drugs used to treat high blood pressure, drugs used to treat excess urination, some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, glucosamine supplements, and magnesium hydroxide. “Not all the drying mechanisms of the various drugs involved are fully understood,” the article states. “Some of them are known to suppress the action of receptors on nerve cells in various glands, including the salivary glands, that produce fluids.”

The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provides additional information on xerostomia for dental professionals.

Proper Toothbrush Storage “Really Matters.”

April 24th, 2017

USA Today notes that toothbrushes can harbor bacteria, including fecal coliform bacteria. Although it is unlikely these bacteria will cause adverse health effects, USA Today states that “how you store your toothbrush is often what really matters.” The article notes that the American Dental Association recommends people rinse their toothbrushes with tap water after brushing and allow toothbrushes to air dry, since covering toothbrushes can create an environment more conducive to bacteria growth. In addition, the article recommends people replace their toothbrushes every three to four months and never share a toothbrush.

MouthHealthy.org and the Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provide additional information on toothbrush care for patients and dental professionals. In addition, the ADA provides a list of toothbrushes with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Poor Oral Hygiene, Infection Among Reasons Tongue May Turn White

April 19th, 2017

Refinery discusses reasons why a tongue may turn white, stating that one cause is a film building up on tongues from poor oral hygiene. Other conditions may affect the color and appearance of tongues, such as fungal infections, yeast infections, inflammatory conditions, and cancer. The article advises brushing tongues regularly and seeing a dentist for any concerns.

MouthHealthy.org and the Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provide information on oral cancer for patients and for dental professionals. MouthHealthy.org also provides information on thrush and tongue scrapers.

Natural Teeth Whitening: Fact vs. Fiction

April 12th, 2017

When it comes to teeth whitening, you may see many different methods featured online and in magazines—from oil pulling to charcoal, and even turmeric. It's no surprise that DIY whitening is top of mind, either. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth.

Healthy smiles come in many shades, though it's tempting to think ingredients in our own kitchens could hold the key to a brighter smile. Still, just because a method is natural doesn’t mean it’s healthy. In fact, DIY whitening can do more harm than good to your teeth. Here’s how:

Fruits

Fiction:
The approach maintains you can make your teeth whiter and brighter household staples that are naturally acidic (like lemons, oranges, apple cider vinegar), contain digestive enzymes (such as pineapple or mango) and something that is abrasive (like baking soda).

Fact:
When eaten as usual, fruit is a great choice. However, fruit and vinegar contain acid, and you put your pearly whites at risk when you prolong their contact with your teeth or use them to scrub your teeth because acid can wear away your enamel. Enamel is the thin outer coating of your teeth that protects you from tooth sensitivity and cavities.

Scrubs

Activated charcoal

Fiction:
These methods claim that scrubbing your teeth with ingredients like activated charcoal or a baking soda-hydrogen peroxide paste will bring a shine back to your smile.

Fact:
Using materials that are too abrasive on your teeth can actually make them look more yellow. Enamel is what you’re looking to whiten, but if you’re using a scrub that is too rough, you can actually wear it away. When that happens, the next layer of your tooth can become exposed – a softer, yellow tissue called dentin.

Instead, choose a whitening toothpaste with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. The Seal lets you know the toothpaste you choose is safe, effective and won’t damage your teeth.

Spices and Oils

Turmeric powder

Fiction:
Swishing oils like coconut oil in your mouth (oil pulling) or using spices like turmeric can help whiten your teeth.

Fact:
There is no reliable scientific evidence to show oil pulling or turmeric whitens teeth. Save the oil and spices for healthy meals instead.

Still Interested in Whitening?

Patient getting her teeth whitened at the dentist

The best natural ways to keep your teeth white are everyday healthy habits, including:

If you want to try a specific whitening product or service, just talk to your dentist before you begin. Whitening may not work on all teeth, and if you are a candidate, some methods—whether at-home or in the dental office—may be better for your teeth than others.

for more information please visit www.mouthhealthy.org

Receiving Preventive Care Among Tips To Stay Healthy And Live Longer.

March 20th, 2017

In an article and broadcast on its website, TODAY shares tips on how to stay healthy and live longer, while avoiding hip fractures. The tips include standing on one leg at a time while brushing teeth for two minutes to help with balance, along with incorporating jumping into exercise routines, receiving enough calcium and vitamin D3 each day, and managing stress. TODAY also emphasizes the importance of preventive care, including dental visits, to maintain health and avoid higher health costs in the future.

MouthHealthy.org provides oral health information by life stages, including for adults between 40 and 60 and adults over 60.

6 Ways to Make Your Mouth Extra Kissable for Valentine’s Day

February 15th, 2017

From the “Kiss Me” messages on tiny candy hearts to romantic songs on the radio, a kiss is probably on your list this Valentine’s Day. Before cozying up to your loved one this year, make sure your mouth is in good health because, as it turns out, a kiss is more than just a kiss.

Kissing stimulates saliva, which can help fight cavities. However, if the person you’re kissing has poor dental and overall health, you run the risk of getting unwanted germs, illnesses or diseases instead of candy, flowers or cards this Valentine’s Day.

Here’s what you need to know about making your smile a vision of love for February 14.

Cavities Can Be Contagious
Whether through kissing or something as simple as sharing a fork, the bacteria that causes cavities can spread to another person. Brush twice a day for two minutes and clean between your teeth once a day for cleaner kisses and a cavity-free smile.

Beware Bad Breath
Bacteria is a big culprit of bad breath, so regular habits like brushing and flossing are especially important. Other ways to stay fresh are over-the-counter antimicrobial mouthwashes or chewing sugarless gum. Both can freshen your breath instantly and get saliva flowing—especially after you eat foods with a strong scent. (And look for the ADA Seal of Acceptance on both!)

Share a Life (But Not a Toothbrush)
For many couples, a big relationship step is keeping a toothbrush at each other’s place. Just make sure you each have your own because sharing toothbrushes also means sharing germs.

Brighten Your Smile
Nothing is more attractive than a confident smile. If whitening makes you feel better about yours, talk to your dentist about which option is best. There are a number of over-the-counter whitening products, or you could get an in-office treatment at your dentist.

Smoking Isn’t Attractive
Smoking is bad for your breath and stains your teeth – not to mention terrible for your overall health. Smoking affects how well you smell and taste. People who use tobacco twice as likely to get gum disease as someone who doesn’t smoke. Smokers are also more at risk for oral cancer. Give yourself a gift this Valentine’s Day and quit today.

Don’t Forget About the Dentist!
A good relationship with and regular visits to your dentist can help keep your mouth at its best all year long. Your dentist can help keep you healthy, discuss any concerns and give more advice on keeping your smile fresh.

For more information please visit MouthHealthy.org

Old Toothbrushes Among Items To “Toss Immediately.”

February 8th, 2017

In a consumer-focused article, Realtor includes old toothbrushes among several bathroom items to “toss immediately” for “the sake of space, your health, and your sanity.” The article states that for those who have been using the same toothbrush for more than three or four months “that’s too long,” according to the American Dental Association. In addition, toothbrushes should be replaced sooner if bristles are “bent or frayed,” since they do not clean teeth as well. The article also encourages people to dispose of old makeup; expired sunscreen; hotel toiletries; almost empty shampoo bottles; unused beauty products and gifts; old razors; and expired medications, encouraging people to follow the FDA’s guidelines for safely disposing unused medication.

MouthHealthy.org and the Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provide additional information on toothbrush care for patients and for dental professionals. In addition, the ADA provides a list of toothbrushes with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

The Itero Element Intraoral Scanner is here!!

February 6th, 2017

We'll make a great first impression!

The Itero Element Scanner is a state-of-the-art digital impression system that eliminates the need for messy putty in your mouth. With our Itero Element Scanner, we can digitally capture a detailed 3D model of your teeth and gums. Not only is this process far more comfortable than the old putty based impressions, but it's faster and can offer a superior clinical endpoint.

During the impression process, you can breath or swallow as you normally would. You can even pause during the process if you need to sneeze or just want to ask a question. The scanner gives us a 3D model of your mouth that can be used for dental services including the Invisalign outcome simulator to show you what your new smile might look like. We can also use the scanner to make retainers and appliances! be sure to ask us about our new digital scanner at your next appointment!

Study Shows that E-cigarettes Damage Gums, Teeth

January 25th, 2017

E-cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular among young people. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), vaping—a term for the practice of smoking an e-cigarette—tripled among middle and high schoolers from 2013 to 2014. The CDC says 13.4% of high school students used e-cigarettes in 2014. The figure stood at 4.5% the year prior. Among middle schoolers, 1.1% used the devices in 2013, increasing to 3.96% in 2014.

According to a news release from the university, scientists had previously thought that it was the smoke itself from cigarettes that caused health complications, however, this study, among others, suggests otherwise.

Lead researcher Irfan Rahman, PhD, said in the University’s news release, “We showed that when the vapors from an e-cigarette are burned, it causes cells to release inflammatory proteins, which in turn aggravate stress within cells, resulting in damage that could lead to various oral diseases. … How much and how often someone is smoking e-cigarettes will determine the extent of damage to the gums and oral cavity.”

Related: Long-Term Effects of E-Cigarettes Unclear

According to the news release, the study used human gum tissue and exposed it to e-cigarette vapor. Among the results was the finding that the flavoring chemical of the components “play a role” in causing harm to mouth tissues.

Fawad Javed, a post-doctoral student at Eastman Institute for Oral Health, said in the release that some flavorings “made the damage to the cells even worse.”

A useful reminder for your patients: “It’s important to remember that e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is known to contribute to gum disease,” Javed said. - See more at: http://www.dmdtoday.com/news/groundbreaking-study-shows-that-e-cigarettes-damage-gums-teeth?

Archaeologists Discover Earliest Dental Prosthesis In Italy.

January 19th, 2017

International Business Times reported that “archaeologists have found the earliest dental prosthesis in Tuscany, in the collective tomb of an aristocratic family from the late Middle Ages.” The dental prosthesis, which may date back to the 14th century, is made of “five human teeth linked together by a golden band” to “replace the anterior arch of the jaw.”

The Daily Mail reported that the archaeologists said in their paper published in Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, “This dental prosthesis provides a unique finding of technologically advanced dentistry in this period.”

for more information please visit www.ibtimes.co.uk.com

Halitosis

January 9th, 2017

Bad breath happens. If you’ve ever gotten that not-so-fresh feeling on a date, at a job interview or just talking with friends, you’re not alone. Studies show that 50 percent of adults have had bad breath, or halitosis, at some point in their lives.

What Causes Bad Breath?
There are a number of reasons you might have dragon breath. While many causes are harmless, bad breath can sometimes be a sign of something more serious.

Bacteria
Bad breath can happen anytime thanks to the hundreds of types of bad breath-causing bacteria that naturally lives in your mouth. Your mouth also acts like a natural hothouse that allows these bacteria to grow. When you eat, bacteria feed on the food left in your mouth and leaves a foul-smelling waste product behind.

Dry Mouth
Feeling parched? Your mouth might not be making enough saliva. Saliva is important because it works around the clock to wash out your mouth. If you don’t have enough, your mouth isn’t being cleaned as much as it should be. Dry mouth can be caused by certain medications, salivary gland problems or by simply breathing through your mouth.

Gum Disease
Bad breath that just won’t go away or a constant bad taste in your mouth can be a warning sign of advanced gum disease, which is caused by a sticky, cavity-causing bacteria called plaque.

Food
Garlic, onions, coffee… The list of breath-offending foods is long, and what you eat affects the air you exhale.

Smoking and Tobacco
Smoking stains your teeth, gives you bad breath and puts you at risk for a host of health problems. Tobacco reduces your ability to taste foods and irritates gum tissues. Tobacco users are more likely to suffer from gum disease. Since smoking also affects your sense of smell, smokers may not be aware of how their breath smells.

Medical Conditions
Mouth infections can cause bad breath. However, if your dentist has ruled out other causes and you brush and floss every day, your bad breath could be the result of another problem, such as a sinus condition, gastric reflux, diabetes, liver or kidney disease. In this case, see your healthcare provider.

How Can I Keep Bad Breath Away?
Brush and Floss
Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss to get rid of all that bacteria that’s causing your bad breath.

Take Care of Your Tongue
Don’t forget about your tongue when you’re taking care of your teeth. If you stick out your tongue and look way back, you’ll see a white or brown coating. That’s where most of bad breath bacteria can be found. Use a toothbrush or a tongue scraper to clear them out.

Mouthwash
Over-the-counter mouthwashes can help kill bacteria or neutralize and temporarily mask bad breath. It’s only a temporary solution, however. The longer you wait to brush and floss away food in your mouth, the more likely your breath will offend.

Clean Your Dentures
If you wear removable dentures, take them out at night, and clean them thoroughly before using them again the next morning.

Keep That Saliva Flowing
To get more saliva moving in your mouth, try eating healthy foods that require a lot of chewing, like carrots or apples. You can also try chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on sugar-free candies. Your dentist may also recommend artificial saliva.

Quit Smoking
Giving up this dangerous habit is good for your body in many ways. Not only will you have better breath, you’ll have a better quality of life.

Visit Your Dentist Regularly
If you’re concerned about what’s causing your bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems such as gum disease or dry mouth and stop them before they become more serious. If your dentist determines your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care doctor.

Source; https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en

NIH: Differences Between Those Who Floss And Those Who Don’t Can Be “Striking.”

November 30th, 2016

In its November newsletter, the National Institutes Of Health states that although news stories have questioned the benefits of dental flossing due to lacking research, dentists have “seen the teeth and gums of people who floss regularly and those who haven’t,” and “the differences can be striking.” The article notes that “red or swollen gums that bleed easily” can indicate “flossing and better dental habits are needed.” A dental health expert at NIH says, “Cleaning all sides of your teeth, including between your teeth where the toothbrush can’t reach, is a good thing.” While strong evidence showing the benefits of flossing “may be somewhat lacking,” the article observes that “there’s little evidence for any harm or side effects from flossing, and it’s low cost.” The article encourages people to talk to their dentist to address any questions or concerns about their teeth or gums and to learn the proper flossing technique.

The ADA has released a statement on the benefits of using interdental cleaners, and a Science in the News article titled “The Medical Benefit of Daily Flossing Called Into Question” discussed evidence about the impact of flossing on oral health.

MouthHealthy.org also provides resources for patients on flossing, including the correct flossing technique.

Dental Sealents are safe and affective in preventing tooth decay

November 2nd, 2016

The Sarasota (FL) Herald-Tribune  has picked up the article in the New York Times “The Upshot” blog reporting that a 2013 Cochrane review and a systematic review published in the August edition of The Journal of the American Dental Association both concluded that sealants are a valuable procedure that can protect children’s teeth because they are “effective in reducing cavities.” The article points out that the American Dental Association “encourages sealant application” and notes current evidence indicates BPA exposure from sealants is not harmful.

The systematic review of the use of sealants and the updated clinical practice guidelines are both available in the August issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association. The ADA News also reported previously on research published in the ADA Professional Product Review that shows BPA in dental sealants is safe.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on sealants.

October is National Dental Hygiene Month

October 24th, 2016

October is National Dental Hygiene Month. It’s also a great time to remind enrollees about the importance of good oral hygiene and the role your dental program plays in helping you develop – and maintain – a healthy mouth and smile. Delta Dental’s Federal Employees Dental Program has plan options that are designed to provide great coverage for routine diagnostic and preventive services like exams, x-rays and cleanings along with nationwide access to our large dentist network so that it’s easy on your wallet and convenient for you to visit your dentist regularly.

The Four Components of Good Oral Health Maintenance:

Brush Teeth Twice Daily
Always brush two minutes, two times a day
Floss every day
Ensure flossing is a daily habit.
Try Text2Floss if you have trouble remembering
Rinse with Mouthwash
Use mouthwash to improve oral health
Chew Sugar-Free Gum
Chewing sugar-free gum after eating can help fight tooth decay
for more info, The American Dental Hygienist's Association has wonderful resources on their website

YouTube Culture Spreading DIY Dentistry

September 26th, 2016

A piece in the American Student Dental Association’s September issue of ASDA News discusses do-it-yourself dentistry, a trend that is spreading through a number of YouTube videos highlighting the practice. For example, a video seen nearly 2.2 million times that is titled “Dentists Hate This Video!” shows a young woman using a do-it-yourself method for a cavity. Her video is “one of hundreds touting all kinds of homegrown cures for dental problems.” The article states lack of dental coverage and dental fear seem to motivate most of the “do-it-yourselfers.” Those two factors, “combined with internet access,” have resulted in “a do-it-yourself mentality of dental diagnosis and treatment that isn’t likely to end well.” In addition, “a growing number of people who take dental care into their own hands” are motivated by trust, the article states. “Building trust with patients is the most important thing you can do as a dentist,” says Dr. Kim Harms, ADA spokeswoman. “It’s your No. 1 clinical commodity. Unless patients can feel like they’re in control over their treatment plan, they won’t come to you.”

for more information please visit editiondigital.net

What You Need to Know About the Safety of Dental Sealants

September 13th, 2016

The American Dental Association guidelines recommend dental sealants for all children and teens due to the tremendous effectiveness of sealants to prevent and arrest the progression of caries. The oral health community and the public have been concerned about the potential adverse effects associated with the release of BPA from resin-based dental sealants. Testing by the ADA Science Institute found:
1.BPA detected at trace levels on dental sealants
2.BPA exposure from dental sealants is 100 times lower than BPA present in the air
3.BPA levels in dental sealants tested were well below the daily exposure level set by the EPA

Read the full report in the new online edition of the ADA Professional Product Review and share this helpful infographic on the safety of dental sealants with your patients.

Patients With Gum Disease May Be More Likely To Suffer Heart Attack, Stroke, Severe Chest Pain, Study Indicates.

September 6th, 2016

Reuters (8/23, Crist) reports that “a study of more than 60,000 dental patients” indicated that “those with gum disease were twice as likely to have had a heart attack, stroke or severe chest pain.” Researchers found that “even after taking other risk factors for cardiovascular disease into account, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking,” individuals “with periodontal disease were still 59 percent more likely to have a history of heart problems.” The findings were published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

AHA Sets New Standard For Added Sugars In Children’s Diet.

September 1st, 2016

The Hill (8/22, Wheeler) reports that the American Heart Association has announced a new standard for how much sugar children should consume a day. The group is “recommending only 6 teaspoons – the equivalent of about 100 calories or 25 grams – for children ages 2 to 18.” It also recommended children under 2 not consume any added sugars. The recommendations were published in the AHA journal Circulation.

AFP (8/22) notes that the AHA’s report found that American children on average eat three times more sugar than its daily recommended intake. The report said, “Eating foods high in added sugars throughout childhood is linked to the development of risk factors for heart disease, such as an increased risk of obesity and elevated blood pressure in children and young adults.”
For more information visit: MorningHuddle.com

Brushing Teeth, Flossing Among Recommended Daily Habits.

August 29th, 2016

Business Insider (8/21, Gillett) includes brushing teeth and flossing among “17 quick and easy daily habits” that readers recommend to become a healthier person. The article notes that the ADA recommends brushing twice a day and flossing daily. Not following this guidance could increase the risk for developing other health issues, the article adds.

In an article in the Free Press (ME) (8/18), the Maine Dental Association noted that “the American Dental Association recommends brushing for two minutes twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, cleaning between teeth once a day with floss or another interdental cleaner, and visiting a dentist regularly.”

In the Harvard University (MA) (8/17) “Harvard Health Blog,” Robert Shmerling, MD, an associate professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, discusses recent news questioning the benefits of dental flossing, citing a lack of research. Dr. Shmerling states, “These headlines...miss the mark on this flossing kerfuffle,” and he adds that “unproven is unproven, not disproven.” The “obvious next step,” says Dr. Shmerling, is for researchers to have “a well-funded, well-designed study” to examine the health impact of flossing. In the meantime, “I’m not going to wait for the research; I’m going to keep flossing,” he states.

The ADA has released a statement on the benefits of using interdental cleaners, and a Science in the News article titled “The Medical Benefit of Daily Flossing Called Into Question” discusses evidence about the impact of flossing on oral health.

MouthHealthy.org also provides resources for patients on flossing, including the correct flossing technique.

Mouthguards Help Protect Children From Dental Emergencies.

August 22nd, 2016

The Danville (CA) Patch (8/14) stated that “a mouthguard is an essential piece of athletic gear,” recommending children wear mouthguards while “participating in sports and recreational activities” to help minimize the risk of dental damage and facial injuries. The article noted that three types of mouthguards exist: custom-made, ready-made, and boil and bite.

MouthHealthy.org and the Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provide additional information on mouthguards for patients and for dental professionals.

Fox News: Charcoal Teeth Whitening Products Do Not Have ADA Seal Of Acceptance.

August 16th, 2016

Fox News (8/15) reports that dentists and other medical professionals are warning against using a DIY teeth whitening method that “involves smearing a charcoal-derived black mixture on teeth.” The method has become more popular since the posting of a YouTube video, that has been watched more than 1.5 million times. The article reports that dentists say using this DIY method “may lead to enamel deterioration and tooth erosion,” noting “the American Dental Association has currently not evaluated or approved any charcoal teeth whitening products.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on teeth whitening. In addition, several whitening toothpastes and a whitening product have the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Dental Sealants Safe And Effective In Preventing Tooth Decay.

August 8th, 2016

The ADA News (8/1, Manchir) reports that “a 6-year-old child is exposed to more BPA” from food, drinks, and cosmetic products “than from the amount that is in dental sealants,” according to research published in the August issue of the ADA Professional Product Review. The article reports that “the ADA Science Institute staff tested the BPA release from 12 dental sealants used by dentists in the U.S.,” finding the BPA released from dental sealants is .09 nanograms, “well below” the EPA’s “limit proposed for a 6-year-old child.” Dr. David Sarrett, PPR editor, said, “This issue of the PPR provides a much-needed perspective on the amount of BPA in dental materials compared with other sources of exposure.”

In addition, a release on PRNewswire (8/1), states in continuing coverage that “a new systematic review and updated clinical practice guideline from the American Dental Association (ADA) and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) show dental sealants are a powerful and effective therapy in the fight against childhood dental decay and disease.” The systematic review and the updated clinical practice guidelines are both available in the August issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association and the July/August issue of AAPD’s Pediatric Dentistry Journal. Lead author Dr. Timothy Wright said, “The joint report reaffirms that sealants should be a routine part of cavity prevention, as children with sealants are up to 80 percent less prone to cavities compared to those without them.”
For more information visit www.ADA.com

Increasing Number Of Adults Turning To Braces.

August 4th, 2016

US News & World Report (7/27, Esposito) reports that adults are increasingly “getting braces to straighten their teeth, fix their bites and improve their smiles.” The article reports that “adults made up a record high of nearly 1.5 million orthodontics patients in the U.S. and Canada,” according to a 2014 survey from the American Association of Orthodontists. According to the article, “This rising popularity” is due in part to “orthodontic options that make braces inconspicuous.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on braces.

JADA Article Discusses Antibiotic Use In Dentistry.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (7/25) reported that the CDC and the Organization for Safety, Asepsis, and Prevention (OSAP) collaborated to publish an article in The Journal of the American Dental Association August issue, concerning responsible antibiotic use in dentistry. According to the article, “In an effort to improve antibiotic use in dentistry, best practices were developed to guide dentists through the entire antibiotic prescribing process.”

The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org provides additional information on antibiotic stewardship for dental professionals.

Flossing Advised “If You Want To Keep Your Teeth.”

August 1st, 2016

In an articled titled, “Turns out, you really only need to floss if you want to keep your teeth,” the New York Daily News (7/25, Pesce) discusses flossing, noting the CDC’s recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found one-third of adults do not floss. “Do you need to floss? It depends on whether you want to keep your teeth or not,” said Dr. Matthew Messina, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Although many Millennials have benefited from fluoridated water and fluoride toothpaste, resulting in a lower decay rate, “our body chemistry does change as we get a older,” said Dr. Messina. “So some people might have a very high host-resistance (against bacteria) when they’re young, but they are going to find that is not the case as they get older.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on flossing, including how to properly floss teeth.

ADA Spokesperson Discusses Biggest Cavity Myth.

July 26th, 2016

A consumer-directed video on the Business Insider (7/21) website features American Dental Association spokesperson Dr. Ada Cooper discussing dental carries. “The biggest myth about cavities is that if it doesn’t hurt you don’t need to fix it,” Dr. Cooper said. “That is completely wrong.” She states that when a cavity has begun to cause pain, it usually requires “more extensive treatment” at that point. Explaining what causes dental decay and why some people may have more cavities than others, Dr. Cooper says “brushing and flossing, of course, are the best way to minimize the number of cavities that you get.” In addition, dentists have many tools available, such as fluoride rinses and treatments, to make teeth more resistant to dental decay. “The best thing to do,” Dr. Cooper says, is to have regular dental visits to ensure detection and treatment of cavities while they’re still small.

The Oral Health Topics on ADA.org and MouthHealthy.org provide additional information on caries for dental professionals and for patients.

Reader’s Digest: People May Make Eight Common Mistakes Brushing Teeth.

July 25th, 2016

Stating that it’s easier than one might think “to make tooth brushing mistakes,” Reader’s Digest (4/13, Bender) identified eight common mistakes people may make while brushing. For example, a common mistake is not brushing teeth long enough, the article stated, noting that “the American Dental Association recommends brushing for two minutes, but many people fall woefully short—and don’t even realize it.” According to the article, common mistakes also include brushing too hard, using an incorrect angle while brushing, using a toothbrush with bristles that are too firm, using a toothbrush head that is too large, using the same toothbrush for too long, not flossing regularly, and not brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. “Dental disease is totally preventable,” says ADA spokesperson Dr. Sally Cram, “and a lot of it can be avoided by stepping up your home brushing program and having check-ups.”

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on the proper brushing technique.

USA Today Covers Study Finding Nail Biting And Thumb Sucking May Reduce Risk Of Developing Allergies.

July 21st, 2016

USA Today (7/19, May) discusses a new study, which CBS News first reported on last week, that finds children who suck their thumbs or bite their nails are less likely to develop certain allergies. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, “observed more than 1,000 participants from childhood to adulthood,” finding that “at age 13, 38% of children who frequently sucked their thumb or bit their nails had an allergy, compared to 49% of those who didn’t.” The results were similar for these individuals at age 32. Despite the findings, the authors said, “We do not suggest that children should be encouraged to take up these oral habits.”

Harvard University (MA) (7/19, McCarthy) added that continued thumb sucking after permanent teeth come in may cause problems with proper alignment of teeth. The article notes the American Dental Association offers tips to help children stop sucking their thumbs, recommending, for example, parents praise children when they are not sucking their thumbs.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on nail biting and thumb sucking for patients.

Workplace “Cake Culture” Contributing To Poor Oral Health, Obesity, UK Dentist Says.

July 19th, 2016

BBC News (UK) (6/24, Gallagher) reported that Professor Nigel Hunt from the Faculty of Dental Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons says the office “cake culture” is fueling dental and obesity problems. At the organization’s annual dinner for dentists, Prof. Hunt said, “For many people the workplace is now the primary site of their sugar intake and is contributing to the current obesity epidemic and poor oral health.”

The Daily Mail (6/24, Spencer) reported that Prof. Hunt is “particularly concerned that excessive consumption of sugary treats such as cakes, sweets and biscuits is contributing to tooth decay in adults,” encouraging employers to offer nuts, fruit, and cheese instead of sugary treats when celebrating special occasions or rewarding staff.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information for patients on how food affects dental health.

Chewing Sugar-Free Gum May Contribute To Oral Health.

July 12th, 2016

In article titled, “This $1 Habit Could Save You Hundreds In Dental Bills,” Men’s Health (7/9, Brabaw) stated chewing sugar-free gum is “a simple (and incredibly cheap!) trick” to help promote oral health and reduce dental costs. “Anything we can do to reduce the amount of acid and bacteria in your mouth will help prevent tooth decay,” said Dr. Matthew Messina, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. “And that means less dental work over time.” According to the article, chewing gum increases saliva production, which helps remove food and neutralizes acids that wear away at enamel. Dr. Messina recommends chewing sugar-free gum after eating for at least 20 minutes, adding that gum does not replace brushing and flossing. “There’s no better way to take care of your teeth than the usual brushing, flossing, and occasional check in with your dentist,” said Dr. Messina.

MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on chewing gum to prevent dental caries. The ADA also provides a list of sugar-free gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

For more information visit:MorningHuddle@ada.bulletinhealthcare.com

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